Letters

From the week of July 8, 1999

Archie Brown
Dallas, Texas

Though strongly pro-life and finding the doctor and myself in sharp contrast on almost all points, I don't think he would be disappointed in your coverage. You were respectful of him and his views. Well reported!

Bill Tomlinson
via Internet

Amy Silverman, how did you keep from puking all over his handmade rugs? This guy is the worst of the worst and makes you want to pray for a very long time in dying for him, and those like him. Thanks for the info, I think.

Suzanne Garner
via Internet

What a man! My deepest respect to him, his wife and Amy Silverman for writing so eloquently about the abortion problem.

I learned my lesson in the slums of Mexico City, doing volunteer work. I guess Dr. Finkel learned his lesson in Asia.

It is invigorating to read about people who are brave and don't give a damn, even if not giving a damn means isolation.

Sofia Gonzalez
San Antonio, Texas

I will be kind to Pastor Jonathan Massey and say that he speaks out of ignorance or that he misspeaks and that his words belie his actual feelings (Letters, June 24). My reference is to the pastor's statement, "I wish every New Times reader would . . . read about Hitler's childhood and how he fought back at an unjust world when fate granted him a big opportunity. . . ." The obvious and, I hope, untoward implication of the good pastor's statement is that Hitler sought justice when he deliberately murdered millions of Jews, Poles, Russians and others because he deemed them to be subhuman. Moreover, there is nothing in Hitler's childhood that was particularly difficult, and it was calculated thuggery, not some accident of fate, that "granted him a big opportunity." The appellation "killer" that he used to describe Dr. Finkel would be put to better use if he had applied it to Hitler.

Bud Arkules
via Internet

I just wanted to thank you for writing the article about the abortionist Brian Finkel. He has a typical attitude for an abortionist; he is just more outspoken about it than most. They need to be exposed.

Pat Goltz, co-founder
Feminists for Life

To Dr. Finkel: Thanks for being you. Thanks for caring about those Filipino prostitutes. Thanks for talking to women first with their clothes on, so they will feel like a person. Thanks for decorating your office. Thanks for using 15 mg of Valium. Thanks for being a marshmallow underneath all that other stuff. Thanks for being the voice for women.

Name withheld by request

I got as far as "On the da-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-r-rk side . . ." when I looked at the date of this New Times issue. Surprised that it isn't the April 1 edition, and assuming it's a somewhat accurate article, I'm scared. I thought the likes of Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Kaczynski and the "scientists" in WWll Japanese POW camps were insane. Boy, do we ever have a madman here in our fair city!

Don Schloeder
Mesa

I'm an infrequent reader of New Times; however, I was lucky enough to grab an issue with your article about Dr. Finkel on the cover, and I wanted to tell you thanks so much for researching and writing about this great man, a Valley hero, who through his kindness, confidentiality and medical expertise virtually saved my life, lifestyle and mental health by providing his most valuable services to me years ago.

You forgot to write about, and probably couldn't, the fact that this man performs much more than medical services to women: He affords them the chance to "right their wrongs, start over from a clean slate," and complete their education, not to mention avoiding having to marry an unloving and abusive man, becoming a welfare recipient or a patient in a mental hospital, all for the sake of a "thumbnail size" piece of tissue implanted in their body during a drunken/drugged, one-night stand which will grow to the size of a Mack truck, a painful and possibly dangerous delivery, a stretch-marked fat belly, bottom and sagging breasts, which no personal trainer or aerobics class in the world will ever be able to get rid of.

Oh, and let us not forget having to "warehouse" the infant out to daycare the day after delivery and expect a minimum-wage worker to give the child the same love and caring that a mother would. Ha, and that's the way it is now for many of the women who want their babies since a growing number of women can't afford to stay home with them.

You can always put it up for adoption and end up searching for "your mistake" for the rest of your life, while your offspring searches for, wonders about and wishes to confront you with the question of why you gave him or her up. Just ask my adopted sister, who, after 20 years, is still looking for her "real" mother and father and can only forget about it when she drowns in a bottle of vodka and whatever juice.

And just think, 30 years ago we were only allowed to talk about "shaming the family" before we were sent off to an unwed mothers' home at age 15, banished, only to be seen again in a different town.

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