"Nigga," Please

Two rival b-boys dance around the N-word

Eminem's down with his niggas. Puerto Ricans like J.Lo and Fat Joe, and even that Asian kid in the baggy jeans, they claim posses of niggas. Thanks in large part to the marketing of commercial hip-hop, what was arguably the most destructive word in the English language has (rightly or wrongly) morphed itself into a term of endearment -- for blacks, sure, but for whites, browns and beiges, too.

House One, a Mexico City-born Hispanic and the leader of the local hip-hop crew Furious Styles, believed Darryl Khalid was his nigga. Until Khalid, a black choreographer and founder of rival dance troupe FootKlan, took offense to House's use of the word outside a Scottsdale nightclub almost a year and a half ago.

Now, House no longer calls Khalid a nigga, much less his nigga. Rather, House says, Khalid's just an opportunistic troublemaker playing the race card.

It's on? Hip-hoppists go pie a pie.
Brian Stauffer
It's on? Hip-hoppists go pie a pie.
Darryl Khalid with Luciana Bell
Darryl Khalid with Luciana Bell

"Darryl's trying to get some fame right now, and he's trying to get it by coming at us," says House, who teaches a hip-hop dance class at Arizona State University, and gives private lessons to the kids of Valley celebrities, like Dan Majerle and Rick Schroeder. "We're not gonna play into it."

But House, whose real name is Edson Magana, according to ASU's dance department (although he refused to confirm that with New Times), is finding it increasingly difficult to avoid the tension he says Khalid has contrived.

Since that September 2003 night outside Jetz nightclub, FootKlan (at Khalid's behest) has crisscrossed the Valley -- from Glendale to Phoenix and even to Fountain Hills -- to issue challenge upon challenge to the Furious Styles crew for an old-school b-boy "battle." Not with fists or guns, but with popping and locking, helicopters and head spins.

"It's just about respect, man," says Khalid, outside downtown's Old Brickhouse on a recent Friday night.

Call it a modern-day West Side Story, only without the star-crossed lovers caught in the middle. This is how "real b-boys and b-girls, genuine hip-hop warriors" settle their differences, Khalid says, sporting a gold, velour jumpsuit and his trademark braids.

But to House, who spoke with New Times days later regarding Khalid and this supposed beef, Khalid's got ulterior motives.

"It's about getting publicity," says House. "Darryl needs some right now."


The rift between Furious Styles and FootKlan began with a contentious conversation between House and Khalid on a late summer night in 2003 outside Jetz in Scottsdale, spawning months of racial tension and bravado from both sides.

"We should be unifying the hip-hop scene here," Khalid says he told House that night. "If we all work together, there's no reason why all of us can't make money."

Both House and Khalid work hard to get their respective crews shows with local dance companies, national and international b-boy competitions and community service events, as well as sponsorships. A performance can earn each crew as much as $500 a dancer, according to House and Khalid, and sometimes even more, including travel expenses for competitions as far away as China and Japan. (Furious Styles, for instance, toured with the Australian dance troupe Tap Dogs, opening shows during a two-month gig in Tokyo back in 2002.)

Furious Styles, a small crew of about seven dancers, is "surviving" financially, according to House, performing halftime shows for the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury, appearing in hip-hop videos and soda commercials, and even doing bar mitzvahs and weddings. Meanwhile, Khalid and FootKlan -- about a dozen dancers strong -- have found modest success as well since their founding back in 1993, recently performing for the City of Phoenix and an anniversary show for local nightclub 'zine 944.

Khalid boasts that he's seen by a weekly audience of "1.5 million" TV viewers, on the long-running syndicated show Soul Train. Khalid, a.k.a. the "Boogie Monster," and FootKlan member Luciana Bell, a.k.a. "Shine," were crowned "Mr. and Ms. Soul Train" back in 1997. Khalid's younger brother, Kasiem, purportedly owns the national record for most consecutive head spins (47). And the troupe has also performed on the since-canceled Donny and Marie Osmond (the late-1990s version) and Keenen Ivory Wayans shows, as well as BET's Sprite Night and the Vibe Show in New York.

But local gigs, both crews' bread and butter, are in short supply. As a result, both crews find themselves stuck with gigs that don't seem very hip-hop.

House scoffs at a so-called "sponsorship" deal Khalid recently agreed to with a multilevel marketing company known as BodyWise. According to Khalid, BodyWise plans to sponsor FootKlan as it travels to local schools to market vitamins to kids, but only after Khalid and FootKlan put their own money into the program to purchase the products.

"Things aren't going so well for Darryl these days," House postures, despite the fact that Khalid and FootKlan generate other means of income for themselves, such as Khalid's Glendale martial arts studio and dance classes.

But as House sees it, Khalid's message of "unity" outside Jetz back in 2003 was really Khalid's attempt to piggyback Furious Styles' success.

House says he began to discourage Khalid's "con," using a prickly choice of words.

"Well, look, nigga," House admits he said to Khalid. House says, "That's the way I talk. I'm from Chicago. I musta said 'nigga' about 100 times in that conversation."

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