Caged Heat

Rage in the Cage promoter Roland Sarria lets loose the Valley's modern-day gladiators

While Moore insists Sarria doesn't like confrontation, he clearly likes the verbal chess game of a good debate. Lately, Sarria's been studying Mormonism, mainly so he can engage in lively theological discussions with his lawyer friend, who's a Mormon, and entertain himself by going head-to-head with the tie-wearing bicyclists who show up at his door.

"I sit 'em down, let them talk for an hour, and then I hit 'em with my questions," he says, smiling excitedly now. "The first thing I say is, 'Let me ask you this. Is it true that if you die as a Mormon, you become a god, with your own planet, and lots of women?'"

Although Sarria says he found his own relationship with Christ after his divorce and could never convert to Mormonism, something about this particular belief of the LDS faithful, which he can never get them to express in the down-to-earth phrasing he uses, appeals to him.

Roland Sarria and some Ragers-in-training.
Mark Skalny
Roland Sarria and some Ragers-in-training.
Rage in the Cage has grown from a small nightclub event to an extravaganza drawing more than 8,000 spectators to Glendale Arena.
Mark Skalny
Rage in the Cage has grown from a small nightclub event to an extravaganza drawing more than 8,000 spectators to Glendale Arena.

Maybe it goes back to his Alexander the Great mindset, or the occasional Batman leanings. But the idea of ruling your own planet, attended to by a harem of women and worshiped as a god -- the ultimate acknowledgement -- holds a certain undeniable allure to Roland Sarria.

"They never give you a straight answer to that one," he says, "but I always drill 'em, as a salesman: 'Yes or no. C'mon. Do you become a god?' And finally, they say, 'Well, yeah.'

"Cool!" Sarria replies. "You gotta admit, that sounds awesome."

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