Deadly Sanctuary

Sylvia Nobel dreamt of a movie version of her Kendall O'Dell mysteries — until the money disappeared.

They agreed to keep him on the project solely as a favor to Nobel.

"I didn't think he was very knowledgeable, with the way he was trying to pass himself off," Walter Scott says. "He was kind of in the way. Wages and I were in agreement: 'We don't need him, but we'll keep him.'"

It would prove, they believe, the production's fatal error. And that's because it was LaMont who brought in attorney Mark Briggs.

Mark Briggs was brought into the production by Chris LaMont, Sylvia Nobel's one-time writing partner.
Mark Briggs was brought into the production by Chris LaMont, Sylvia Nobel's one-time writing partner.
Chris LaMont
Chris LaMont

Briggs, a partner at Quarles & Brady, is married to a prominent local lobbyist named Wendy Briggs. She's represented everyone from Exxon Mobil to the United Dairymen of Arizona and has been a generous contributor to Arizona politicians of all stripes.

Most recently, she poured $2,300 into John McCain's presidential campaign for president and gave $2,100 to Congressman John Shadegg. But she doesn't just lobby Republicans; earlier this year, Briggs and her husband also hosted a fundraiser for Governor Janet Napolitano in their northwest Phoenix home.

Mark Briggs is also politically involved. He maxed out his contribution for McCain this year and has been involved with several bond committees for the city of Phoenix. He is currently a commissioner on the state committee that chooses appellate court justices.

But this summer, Sylvia Nobel filed a lengthy complaint against Briggs with the Arizona Bar that is still under investigation. She's also filed a lawsuit against him and LaMont. In the complaints, she accuses Briggs of embezzling $810,000 from the production company and LaMont of putting him in place to do it.

Through their lawyer, Geoff Sturr of Osborn Maledon, LaMont and Briggs declined comment. Both "adamantly deny the false accusations," Sturr told New Times in a prepared statement.

In the statement, Sturr paints the falling out between his clients and Nobel as an issue of control. Nobel originally agreed to let Briggs and LaMont manage the project, he says, but later sought to take control — only turning on Briggs when he refused to let her do so.

Nobel, obviously, sees it differently.

Briggs, she says, was brought in to do the legal work for Deadly Sanctuary. The idea, she says, is that he would do $35,000 in legal work in exchange for an interest in the movie. But by the time Briggs and Nobel formally parted ways 16 months later, Briggs claimed that Nobel owed him a whopping $350,000 for his work as a producer.

According to the documents Nobel filed with the court, some backup materials she provided to New Times, and interviews with five key players in the production, here's what happened.

LaMont brought Briggs into the production in October 2006. Briggs is a business attorney who specializes in corporate work, including mergers and acquisitions, but his résumé suggests he has an interest in entertainment: He helped to start the Phoenix Film Foundation and served on the board of Phoenix Theatre.

By the fall of 2007, Nobel was eager to get started with filming. But it seemed to take an absurdly long time for Briggs to work out simple contracts with various production members. Meanwhile, the Hollywood pros, Wages and Scott, had grown so annoyed at what they considered Chris LaMont's diva tendencies, they were demanding that he be fired.

Wages' California-based agent, Debbie Haeusler, tells New Times that she was also growing suspicious. In order to finalize the deal with her client, Haeusler says, she needed to know who stood to make exactly what percentage of the profits. But there were a number of limited liability companies involved — and Haeusler needed answers about the complicated arrangements.

"Mark [Briggs] was a very nice man on the phone, but when I would ask him questions, I'd get these vague answers or things that just seemed weird," she says. "I've been doing this 25 years and, normally, the production attorney is merely a conduit between the producers with the money and the people with the artistic vision."

But that didn't seem to be the case with this production. Ultimately, Haeusler says, Briggs admitted to her that he and LaMont owned a full 75 percent of the production.

"I still don't understand how an attorney ends up owning something like this," Haeusler says. "He was brought in for a fee" — yet he ended up owning a good chunk of the potential profits.

Haeusler decided to call Nobel. She asked her point blank: Do you realize that you only have a minority interest in this production? Do you realize how this deal is structured?

Nobel was shocked.

"We asked Mark about this, several times," she admitted to Haeusler. "We didn't really understand what he was talking about. And he made us feel embarrassed that we didn't understand, so we finally stopped asking."

After her call with the California agent, though, Nobel understood that she had to be a little more hard-nosed. She began pressing Briggs to see the limited liability companies' financial records.

"He would never give me anything," she says. "Mark was just stalling, playing along. He'd say, 'Oh, I forgot to bring that with me.' Or, 'I'm colorblind; I didn't realize my secretary gave me the wrong folder.'"

It was only after Nobel hired a lawyer that she started to get more detailed information.

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34 comments
J.J.
J.J.

Today a friend forwarded to me this very interesting piece by Paul Rosenberg...

Sociopathy is a very important subject, and one we should all be familiar with. Let’s start with definitions, to be clear:

A sociopath is a person who lacks empathy. A psychopath is the same as a sociopath; it is just an older word. This term was more or less dropped when people started calling each other “psycho.” Sociopaths very seldom become “psycho killers.”

There has been a lot of debate over these definitions. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), in its third edition, changed these terms to anti-social personality disorder (ASPD). (In my opinion, this was purposely done to confuse the concept, as well as to promote the sales of psychological services.) In so doing, they obscured the original markers of the condition, which were:

* A lack of empathy. * Superficial charm. * An inflated self appraisal.

These were the original characteristics attributed to sociopathy, and the ones we will stay with.

Lack of empathy is the root of this condition, and the other characteristics flow from that.

Empathy is the ability to imagine ourselves feeling what another is feeling and feeling along with them. It is actually the root of morality, but that explanation will have to wait for another time. What is important now is that empathy lies at the heart of human cooperation. People who lack empathy do not cooperate – they use others. They may use you in ways that appear to be pleasant, but they are still using you.

One of the primary functions of empathy is to say “how would I like it if someone did that to me?” Normal people do this all the time, and it makes us uncomfortable as we begin to do something we really shouldn’t. The sociopath, however, does not feel this. So, with no internal restraints, the sociopath appears confident, unconflicted and charming. This sucks in a LOT of victims.

The third characteristic of sociopaths is an inflated self-appraisal. This seems to be something that sociopaths learn as they pass through childhood. The process works, more or less, like this:

* The empathy routines of ‘normal’ people cause them to presume that sociopaths also have empathy. We tend to think that other people are like us. We would never imagine that the sociopath would care nothing for how we feel.

* The sociopath makes use of others. He gets them to do chores for him, or take the blame for him. Since the rest of us have learned to “pitch-in together” and “watch out for each other,” we play the role the sociopath lays in front of us. We are sure that he’d do the same for us… because we are sure that he is just like us.

* This false pattern gives the sociopath a clear predatory advantage, which normals seem to have no ability to resist.

* Thus the sociopath feels like a member of a more powerful class of beings, and is biased toward the plunder of others. Even in youth, the ease with which normals accept them as ‘meaning well’ confirms a natural order to the sociopath: He uses and the others line-up to be used.

I think you can see from this why people who lack empathy present significant and unusual dangers. This condition exists in only a small minority, but it has caused a massively disproportionate share of damage. The reason for this is simply that people who lack empathy naturally seek power, awards and applause. Obedience, praise and demeaning others become their sources of satisfaction. Being unable to feel empathy also means that they can’t process appreciation and respect the way the rest of us can.

On one hand, it is natural to feel compassion for the sociopath – they are damaged, after all. But, we cannot show compassion for them in the normal way – that plays directly into their abusive game. (Sociopaths seek the compassion of normals – it makes using them much easier.) We should show compassion, first, for the victims of sociopaths. Then, perhaps, someday, methods of fixing sociopaths may be found.

Remember, you cannot allow yourself to play the sociopath’s game, and you should protect yourself and others before you do anything else. That is not being “hard-hearted,” it is merely the acceptance that reality is, in fact, real.

So, how many people are really sociopaths? Figures have ranged from one to four percent, but recent cross-research shows that the true number is probably very close to 2% However, it is also important to know that sociopathy is not all or nothing. Some people are partial sociopaths, rather than full sociopaths. (No matter, they are still almost certain to make use of you.)

Remember that sociopaths are very good at blending in, and that even when you see evidence of their condition, you may have difficulty admitting it.

There is absolutely no known treatment or cure for sociopathy. (Sorry, that’s the truth.)

Here are some tips for recognizing a sociopath:

* They make you feel sorry for them. * They scare or worry you. * They make you feel guilty. * They make you feel that you owe them. * They make you feel used. * They take a lot and give very little back. * They take advantage of your kindness. * They are easily bored. * They blame others, not themselves.

George S.
George S.

I have worked with Chris Lamont in the past and all he did was whine and cry about every little thing. He tried to tell everybody how to do their jobs and would not accept advice from anybody. I even agreed to loan Chris a significant portion of the money for one of his films and he still has not paid me back. What's more is that he listed himself as the executive producer because he "got" the money.

What Chris does not seem to understand is a basic principle of film making, ...it is a collaborative art form which requires many professionals to work together NOT one whiner trying to boss people around. If Chris ever wants to make a film worth watching he should start to listen to trained professionals and stop trying to do everything himself.

Vic
Vic

YOU CAN'T LIE ABOUT HAVING INTEGRITY!

...and "Buyer Beware" is a cheap excuse! It doesn't matter if what they did was "legal" or not, it was IMMORAL. If you can't conduct business with integrity, then you should be made to wear a sign which reads "DIRTBAG" and that's all there is to it. You don't take someone else's film money and buy a titty-bar with it, AND you don't offer to "help" your friend catalog his film collection, then run off with it!

If Chris Lamont wants to know what it feels like to have even the smallest shred of integrity, then he can stand up and admit that he's a liar and a thief, ...then return (or replace) my property.

Jody Gnant
Jody Gnant

I have worked with Chris LaMont on many occasions and he has conducted all of our dealings with integrity. I would do a HANDSHAKE deal with him ANY DAY OF THE WEEK.

Nobel admits to not playing an active role in the legal side:

"We asked Mark about this, several times," she admitted to Haeusler. "We didn't really understand what he was talking about. And he made us feel embarrassed that we didn't understand, so we finally stopped asking."

As an independent artist, I don't care how stupid I felt, I'm not going to let someone shame me out of making sure that my best interests were being considered.

And regardless of what happened, how it happened, whose side your on, and who's to blame, the entire country is going through a rough patch right now. We're all struggling. We've all been scr*wed at some point in our lives; and we're all doing the best we can to pick up our sticks and move on.

Every artist needs a story to stay in the media; but Chris LaMont is not a crook, or a hack. I have always found him to be the type of person that gives more than he receives.

To Nobel: I sincerely hope you find a way to move past this as an artist to become a stronger story teller - and perhaps a little more involved in the business side of your career.

To the Phoenix New Times: Whether or not I agree with you on this story, I am grateful that you exist. There are many stories in Phoenix that would never be told without your presence and muscle (*ahem - Sheriff Joe). Michael Lacy is a pioneer. Niki D'Andrea is my favorite writer in the whole world. And I lurves you gais, too!

To Chris LaMont: If you ever wanna do another deal together, I am always willing to be on your team.

To everyone else: (((hugs)))

Victor
Victor

Chris Lamont is a sleaze-bag. I've known him since elementary school. I was the producer of the first film he worked on. After two years in pre-production, my family put up the money for us to make our movie. Chris used his position of trust to get access to my rare film memorabilia, then walked out on production and disappeared with my property.

I've been asking Chris for my property to be returned for decades now. Guess what he had to say when I cornered him about it?

"I don't know what you're talking about, ...and even if I did, there's nothing you can do about it."

"You abandoned your property and the statute of limitations is up. Besides, my wife's a lawyer and my mom works for the police, ...so get over it".

It looks like he hasn't changed one bit. I don't think "arrogant" or "non-professional" even start to describe this guy. He is a liar and a thief with NO morals. If you have anything to do with Chris Lamont or his associates you're a sleaze-bag too, ...or a SUCKER!

James
James

That the money was returned is beside the point. When you broil the facts as presented down this is a story about a lawyer who abused his clients trust and engaged in what appears to be in unethical behavior. He took advantage of her nativity.

filmguy
filmguy

Quite the hit job...anyone who's ever been on a set knows you don't let writers go anywhere but craft services and NEVER let them produce their own movies. I've met Mr. LaMont on several occasions, and have never found him to be anything but a pro. Don't know Mr. Briggs, but if the money he loaned himself was paid back with interest, that's additional budget, as far as I'm concerned. With micro-budgets on a film production you sometimes have to get creative. Get over it, everyone!

ActorInTempe
ActorInTempe

I first heard of this story over the summer, and I am saddened to see how it has ended up. I forgot about it till I read that the original owner of Sugar Daddy's is going to serve BIG TIME for falsifying books to the IRS.

As far as Briggs and LaMont go. Briggs is a typical attorney - thinks he is infallible and can do whatever he likes or so desires. Thus the whole saying first we kill all lawyers. And as for LaMont. I have had the honor of meeting this egotistical jerk - and have no doubt - his intentions were nothing but shifty and larcenous.

newtimesreader
newtimesreader

Oops for the comment above! I meant to say I would use the borrowed money to buy a house, as an investment tool!Then rent it out!

newtimesreader
newtimesreader

I wish I could work as an accountant for Briggs and have total access to his accounts and of course his complete trust as did Nobel in this case. I would "borrow" some of his money to "invest" for him, then rent it out as my own at the highest amount that I could and eventually "pay the borrowed money back". OR, take out a loan to pay him back. I thought that was called STEALING! (Even if you pay it back) Something taken without permission is stealing, last time I checked. Well, they will get theirs, Nobel, keep writing, look up! You can't go wrong! Your books kept me hooked! Thanks!

bondisback
bondisback

Mark Twain once said, "A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." I've been around long enough to know that there are two sides to any story. I wonder how much this guy can defend himself with ongong litigation. I'm going to make a prediction. The stuntman from the 80's doesn't know as much about making movies as he thinks and the lawyer who gives all the money back is going to be vindicated.

TheSwede
TheSwede

Wow, way to justify some pretty damn shady actions. Actually, it doesn't really matter whether she lost "zero dollars and zero cents". Mr. Briggs did not have the right to invest the money. He was hired for a fairly cut and dried purpose. It truly boggles the mind that two professionals would make such a blatant grab for 75% ownership and set up multiple "hidden" companies to divert funds. Evidently, somebody has some 'splaining to do.

Desertsky
Desertsky

The New Times plays an important civic role in bringing us a story like this.

The anti-Nobel posts strike me as a smear effort by those who wish this piece never saw daylight. (Pathetic!)

Know this: The whole town is now aware and will be talking about it behind the wrongdoers backs for years to come. (Holiday parties they attend will be filled with lots of smirks and private conversation.) It's clear who is right and who is wrong. Very clear. What a shame any of this happened.

Sylvia will write again - and will have very believable bad guys!

CommentQueen
CommentQueen

So the money was "used" to invest in something which in the end gained money. I guess I am not sure why Nobel has an issue... Briggs made more money for this "Movie".

Get over it and move on!!!! Try again. Winners don't give up!!!!

Larry Dallas
Larry Dallas

The books suck anyway. Many more people would have lost much more money, $8.50 at a time, if the movie would have been made.

Briggs is a sleezeball. Sugar Daddy's sucks anyway, and so does the New Times.

Film Maker '08
Film Maker '08

As someone who has worked in both film/television and the financial industry I feel that certain comments made about this article need refuting. First of all the contract involved with regard to the use of the money was created after the money was taken by Mr. Briggs and never signed by Ms. Nobel and therefore bogus. Pretty convenient that your a lawyer who can suddenly create a "contract" on the spot when you need one to cover your tracks. And yes, in Hollywood, a contract that is legitimate is very difficult to break and does cause a lot of furor when there is an issue. This was, however, not the case with this particular contract. From an investment point of view, as a person working in the financial industry and dealing with real estate purchases when this investment was made, the value of real estate was sliding downhill rapidly. So why was this a "good" investment and how was it going to make the film money? In addition, if it was, in fact, intended to be a money making venture to add additional funds for the making of the movie, why wasn't Ms. Nobel consulted and at least allowed to voice an opinion about using the money? The answer to the last question is that Mr. Briggs and especially Mr. LaMont knew she would never agree to using the money to buy a nightclub. These guys were having a good time at the expense of the production and I truly believe they thought they wouldn't get caught. There is no altruism here in this situation just greed and the fact that they thought Ms. Nobel was too naive to ever figure it out.Bottom line is that regardless of motive, the fact that a lawyer helped himself to money that was not his to use should, if nothing else, get him disbarred! This film could have been a real feather in the cap of this state and also put many local industry people to work in this time of rampant joblessness.

FilmFan84
FilmFan84

Sounds like the New Times is fishing for a libel suit against them.....

Dee
Dee

This was a very interesting article. I do not know any of the people involved, however, I do know right from wrong. No matter how you try to twist it, the attorney took money he was not entitled to and spent it for his own purposes. That is illegal and I would think the Attorney General should get involved. Isn't it his (and that of his office) duty to protect us from this kind of action. This tap dancing that is taking place with Ms. Nobel not being able to find an attorney that does not have a connection with the thief attorney is ridiculous.

Another question that was not answered in the article was did all of the investors get their money back or just the 'little old lady' that had put up the million dollars?

I have read Nobel's books and enjoyed them. What a sad world we live in when betrayals like this occur.

JPR
JPR

Looks like these comments are all about "Friends of Sylvia" versus "Friends of Mark", so count me in as an FOM. Noble is waging a smear campaign against a civic-minded guy with a long track record of helping his community. Hey, lawyers should be held to higher standards (even when they are not actually engaged in legal representation), but Noble has an appropriate forum in the State Bar's disciplinary process. Sure seems to me that Mark acted ethically, but ultimately a committee of factfinders will decide. In the meantime, if Noble were really engaged in a search for the truth like her alter ego detective character, she would a) stop asking her own lawyers to engage in potentially unethical conduct [see, e.g. http://www.courtminutes.marico...] and b) tone tone her rhetoric. Or does she not really want the truth?

Joe Gillis
Joe Gillis

The story I just read is just another tale of a person who wanted to become famous by making a movie. I'm sure the majority of us have dreamed that dream at least once in our lives. I congratulate the author for getting as far as you did. Most writers can't secure an agent, let alone financing and you were able to do both. Well done you.

But more often than not, films fall apart for many reasons. Some simple, some complex. While it is a sad story that this film won't get made, it is just that, a story.

In real life the white hats aren't always as clean as they appear in print and the black hats are never as awful as they are portrayed. Especially in articles as one-sided as this one.

Ms. Nobel, get up, dust yourself off and try again. Just because it didn't work this time doesn't mean it won't work next time... Or the tenth time. Just keep trying. But you're going to have to let this particular story end. Because if you continue to bring lawsuits and accuse your co-workers through the press, no one is going to work with you.

That's a fact.

AZGoldenGirl
AZGoldenGirl

This article, like every New Times article, was overwrought, one-sided & written like a tacky melodrama - why didn't you draw evil mustaches on LaMont's & Brigg's pictures? It was about as childish as every single reference made about them - none of which is unbiased, none of which is unsensationalized.

Ms. Nobel, here's where you are lucky - if you were actually IN Hollywood, if your so-called "Hollywood Pros" were completely honest with you, they would have told you one truthful concept - a contract is a contract, and the suggestion of your Bunco Buddy to "have someone else look at it" doesn't fly in the Big Leagues - would you be able to do such shenanigans, such "buyer's remorse" in ANY other industry? No, ma'am. You would've been eaten alive for pulling this in Hollywood.

My goodness, yet again the New Times proves to be a poor man's National Enquirer - all flash, no truth in reporting. The ONLY professionals who did there JOBS in this case were Mr. LaMont and Mr. Briggs, whether you like their jobs or not. Sounds like an extremem case of sour grapes or naivete to me.

Peter J.
Peter J.

As a long time client of and friend of Mark Briggs, I can say this; first, the money didn't "disappear," it was invested and, when the time was appropriate, it was returned to the original investor. That's a lot more than some production companies would do! If the idea's so great, and the fan loves her so much, why won't the little old lady, as this piece of fiction calls her, invest directly in her beloved author? Next, Mark's a man of deep integrity and who would do nothing to impugn on either his or his company's reputation. This is ridiculous, and clearly another one-sided, "poor little author against the big, bad lawyers" fantasy. It's really a shame that someone with half a story can attack the good name of another person. What Mark did to make sure that money was returned was nothing short of heroic, and shows his true character. It will be very interesting when Mark is able to defend himself, and the other half (should say the true half) of the story comes to light. This gal lost ZERO dollars and ZERO cents to Mark, and has no claim whatsoever.

Jonathan
Jonathan

Mark Briggs is well known for his good works, public service, his excellent legal skills, and a great sense of humor. You would be hard pressed to find anyone who would question his ethics or his intelligence.

A complete article would have included a more in-depth look into the reputations of the players involved before printing an account that is one-sided and clearly designed to attack the reputation of a good man.

John
John

About "The Missing Movie"What a classic morality tale!Greedy corporate lawyer can't keep his hands out of the cookie jar. Look at all the collateral damage he has caused to his profession, his employer, his family, his partners, the investors, unknown others and lastly to himself. And for what? He didn't even get to keep the money he stole, he's going to lose the business he bought and might even wind up in jail. Oh, and good-bye to his political career. At least this guy got exposed before he could get into some public office.

Alan Harkrader
Alan Harkrader

This was a fantastic article. I feel so sorry for Sylvia and Jerry. Their story couldn't have been told any better.I have been working with Sylvia on the music for the movie. I have spent many hours creating the moods for the different sceens. I worked with Sylvia to get the feel she was looking for. I have folloiwed her writing carear from the beginning and I can tell you she has impecable dedication to her craft. She has always been brilliant and able to learn from her experiences. ( I went to high school with her) When Bill Wages and Walter Scott came to town to meet them, Sylvia and Jerry brought them into the restaurant where I play music. They were gentlemen and very humble and professional. They were excited about the movie and I played them some of the music that I was working on for the movie. It is clear that you have two distinct groups of people here. On the one side you have an upstanding couple in Slyvia and Jerry, proven professionals in Walter and Bill and Debbie Haeusler, on the other you have an evasive, arrogant, embezzling lawyer, married to a self serving, double agent, lobbyist, and a bailed out criminal brother( two of a kind), and an inept film professor with egomania.It is also shameful that Briggs was so well insulated by the law system. I do feel and pray that justice will prevail.Alan Harkrader

anonymous
anonymous

I know Chris LaMont - he's a decent, honest guy and knows a lot about filmmaking, not the bumbling amateur described in the story.

Mark Briggs, on the other hand, sounds retarded. Every attorney learns in their second year of law school not to enter into business relationships with clients without full consent obtained only after the client has consulted with other counsel. They also learn that to "loan" yourself money that belongs to a client is frowned upon by the Bar and usually results in disbarment. Will be interesting to see how the Bar rules on her complaint.

Marvin Musslewhite
Marvin Musslewhite

I was a private investor in the movie, and I recall the description of the investment in the prospectus indicated rather clearly that I was investing in a movie, not a titty bar in Scottsdale. It also indicated funds collected for the movie were to kept in suitable bank accounts, until drawn upon for production expenses. I don't recall anything in the prospectus that allows the lawyer, working for the people who are producing and investing in the project, to divert the funds to a night club run by his brother. What ever happened to fiduciary responsibility?

It also seems to me, that a lawyer working on such a project, has a higher hurdle of ethical standards to meet, to avoid conflicts of interest, especially when partnering with clients, who are not legal experts. The chance of abuse is too great. A lawyer has to represent the interests of his clients, not his own personal cash flow needs. Is that too much to ask?

If he had problems with Nobel, just walk away. He had nothing but his time, not his capital in the movie. I don't care whether she is dramatic or not, that does not condone diverting the money for his own purposes. I don't obtain a right to steal from people because I may have differences of opinion with them.

This guy Briggs makes all the ugly lawyer jokes I have ever heard in my life seem complimentary to lawyers. He is a disgrace to his profession, and really his greatest critics should be his fellow lawyers. It is sad that this is not the case.

Roxy
Roxy

I find the comments relating to this article very interesting. They seemed to be biased toward the side of Briggs and LaMont...almost as if they had already heard the story from their side. They must be friends of theirs or at the very least acquaintances. I wonder if these friends of theirs would be eager to enter into a business arrangment with either of these two men. Hmmmmm? Considering that there were forged documents and misuse of the production's funds, I highly doubt it. If Briggs' withdrawl of the film production's only assets was on the level, why didn't he tell Nobel what he was doing? Why keep it a secret if he didn't think he was doing anything inappropriate or unethical?

Oh and why is he in default on his loan for the purchase of the night club? I would guess that when he had to return the money to the investors in the film, he probably had to take out a loan for the money himself (which he should have done in the first place if he wanted to own a nightclub) and so is paying off that loan and has no money to pay off his note to the individuals from whom he purchased Sugar Daddy's.

Everyone understands that deals fall through and that a lot of films never end up getting made. However, it is unfortunate that the actions of Briggs and LaMont made this a certainty. I hope that in the future Briggs considers his position before he enters into any business arrangements that are so obviously a conflict of interest.

As far as Nobel is concerned, it seems callous to call her a "spoiled brat." I think this person needs to ask themselves if they had invested as much time and energy, as Nobel has, into a project of their own, how they would feel if it had been squashed by people she trusted. She obviously would never have entered into a partnership with these two men if she did not believe that they had the same vision.

Keep writing and never give up your dream, Nobel. Don't let this unfortunate mess erase all that you have worked so hard for. The best retribution would be your success. I hope that someday you can look back on this as just a bad dream.

Feyd
Feyd

Whoa, Fred D, is Mark Briggs your squash partner or something? You write that this Nobel lady "didn't like some of his business decisions." Like, for instance, refusing to conduct business? Correct me if I'm wrong, but if you went out and raised a million bucks for a movie, gave some shmuck power-of-attorney to disburse that money to actors and cameramen and whatnot and then discovered that said penis-head had in fact used the funds to buy some night club, thereby screwing the entire movie project, I think you'd feel a little butt-hurt, too.

Full disclosure: I've worked with Chris LaMont. I don't think he's larcenous. Given the choice between getting a producer/screenwriting credit on a real-live movie and getting his name dragged through the dirt in the New Times, I'm sure he'd choose the former. But he clearly hitched himself to a real nitwit on this one.

WorkingBrain
WorkingBrain

It looks like we again see "supporters" of Briggs and LaMont coming out of the woodwork only when there is an article that makes them look bad. Guess what? They are bad! You'd have to be a complete stooge or equallycorrupt to support those guys in any way, shape or form.

Nobel didn't just dream of putting together a movie, she did most of the work. It was her novel after all. It's also obvious that she and her husband raised all the money. It was their creativity, their efforts and their industry contacts that moved things forward. What exactly did Briggs do? Briggs and his shell corporations did nothing to advance the film, only to divert funds to a personal investment. Who buys a nightclub with somebody else's money, which obviously isn't a short-term investment, when that money is being prepared for immediate use for film production? Seriously, somebody is going to defend that?! It's not something a veteran film producer or anybody with an ounce of decency would do, that's for sure.

Briggs appears to be nothing but a con man. The project failed because he is a crook, nothing less. LaMont is obviously the spoiled brat, having fits when actual professionals point to his amatuer methods. Why eitherof these sleazy guys still have their jobs, is truly amazing. And since when did it become OK to steal money as long as you give it back under pressure of a lawsuit? Does that erase the original illicit actions in any legal sense? Who are you people who would defend that and pretend to know what actually happened?

Arizoniemom
Arizoniemom

This is a great piece of creative writing, and reads like a novel. Many struggling authors want their books made into movies, but it doesn't always work out. Ms. Nobel sounds like a spoiled brat, trying to ruin the reputations of Mr. LaMont and Mr. Briggs because she didn't get her way. If all the investors have their money back, I don't see what the big deal is. Ms. Nobel seems to be unable to distinguish between reality and the fantasy of her novels.

Fred D.
Fred D.

Let me make sure I understand. This unfortunate woman is a self-published author who dreamed of making her book into a movie. Okay. Fine. But there are tons of self-published authors with that dream. That it didn't come true is not a shock.

Nobel forms a company with Briggs and LaMont, but doesn't like some of their decisions. She is "shocked" to learn that she doesn't control the company. (Since when do writers control the business side of these projects!?)

So LaMont sues her partners. As best I can tell from your article, Briggs does the right thing and informs the investor of the lawsuit. The investor is unhappy about the lawsuit and pulls out her million dollars and so the film project is "ruined." Never mind that there are no guarantees in this business. Never mind tht LaMont filed the lawsuit that ended the project.

Briggs used the funding as a short term loan for his investment. Probably not the best move, considering Nobel's tendency to the dramatic and the fact that she could paint this short-term investment as something sinister and insideous. But hardly illegal. As I understand it, he controlled the company and he paid it all back with interest.

Fenske chooses to paint Briggs as the bad guy even though the fan/investor got EVERY PENNY back. What really caused this film production to collapse? The usual suspects. Clashing of egos between the California producers and LaMont.... Nobel's desire to control the project even though she knew nothing about the business side... and ultimately her lawsuit. It was the lawsuit the scared off the "widow" investor.

But that doesn't make an interesting story. Far better to make the Nobel look like the victim even though Briggs paid back every cent. But I have to hand it to Fenske. This was a great piece of writing. Much more interesting than the real story.

Michael Harrelson
Michael Harrelson

he does put on a good film festival, and he is one of the founders of the IFP here in phoenix,and ASU simply loves him

 
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