BLT Steak Reinvents the Steakhouse with Sashimi Appetizers and Gruyère Popovers

There are plenty of places to get a gorgeous piece of USDA Prime meat in this town, but BLT Steak at Camelback Inn satisfies more than just carnivorous cravings. And for that, it really raises the bar.

I won't name names, but at some of Phoenix's other high-end steakhouses — where appetizers and side dishes are a predictable rundown of standards, and desserts aren't worth a mention — a seared slab of beef is just about the only reason to visit.

To be sure, sometimes it's nice to chow down on a bloody rib eye, knock back a couple of martinis, and call it a day. At BLT Steak, though, the appeal is much broader. While meat is still the main event, eating here is a memorable experience from the first nibble of warm chicken liver pâté to the last bite of gooey espresso-chocolate chip cookies (both gratis). As a result, you leave not only high on protein, but reeling from a whole feast of sensory delights.

Stick to your rib eye: Trust your carnivorous instincts at Camelback Inn's swanky new BLT Steak.
Jackie Mercandetti
Stick to your rib eye: Trust your carnivorous instincts at Camelback Inn's swanky new BLT Steak.

Location Info

Map

BLT Steak

5402 E. Lincoln Drive
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253

Category: Restaurant > American

Region: Paradise Valley

Details

Tuna tartare: $16
New York strip: $43
Dover sole: $50
Orange raspberry sundae: $10
480-905-7979, »web link
Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 5 to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5 to 11 p.m.
BLT Steak, 5402 East Lincoln Drive (at Camelback Inn)

Perhaps it's because this is a steakhouse as interpreted by Laurent Tourondel, a French chef determined to bring a traditional American institution into the 21st century with Gallic panache. ("BLT," by the way, stands for Bistro Laurent Tourondel.)

That he's expanded his national culinary presence from the original BLT Steak in New York City to seven additional outposts in just four years — along with BLT Burger, BLT Fish, BLT Prime, and BLT Market — is certainly a feat, but not a surprise, if the month-old Scottsdale location, helmed by executive chef Marc Hennessy, is any indication. It's hip but comfortable, with amiable, attentive service and lots of thoughtful touches — like the famous freebie Gruyère popovers — along with top-notch steaks.

BLT Steak fills the void left by Camelback Inn's long-running Chaparral Room, which closed last year as part of the resort's $50 million renovation. It's a good-looking space, with windows all around, a whimsical chalkboard along an entire wall, dark wood floors, and oversize cylindrical ceiling lamps that cast a warm, buttery glow on cozy circular booths, long banquettes, and exotic wood tables. Even amidst Camelback Inn's tranquil desert landscape, it has an urbane energy.

As for the menu, it's somewhat homey but flirts with haute. You can certainly have mashed potatoes with your hefty Porterhouse, or you can go trendy with some hen of the woods mushrooms and a Japanese Kobe A5 strip steak (which is charged by the ouch, er, ounce; currently $26 per). The dividing line between contemporary and traditional mainly falls between appetizers and side dishes, with single-person portions for the former and family-style sharable plates for the latter.

Starting with sashimi may be unheard of at mainstream steakhouses, but at a cosmopolitan place like this, it made sense. Here, it was slices of hamachi with creamy avocado purée, tart yuzu vinaigrette, and thinly sliced jalapeño for tiny bursts of heat. Tuna tartare also had a fusion appeal, with ruby bits of fish layered on avocado chunks and a pool of soy-lime dressing. Sprinkled with crispy shallots and resting in a square dish on crushed ice, it was an eye-catching presentation.

I also enjoyed the roasted beet salad with spiced candied walnuts, endive, apple slivers, and creamy Gorgonzola — very flavorful, but light enough that I wasn't sacrificing belly room that might otherwise go to steak. One night's special, though, was so rich that I knew it would take restraint not to devour it: veal cheek ravioli with porcini mushrooms and shaved black truffle. Big surprise, my discipline flew out the window after one bite.

I should mention here that BLT Steak's outstanding Gruyère popovers are the biggest potential pitfall if you're trying to save your appetite. And don't think you can limit yourself to just a couple bites. These huge golden poufs are irresistible — crusty and crispy but airy and moist inside, with a heady cheese aroma that wafts out when you tear them apart. They're served with soft butter and a metal canister of sea salt, plus a miniature recipe card, should you decide to make them at home. (I'm tempted to make them for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.)

Side dishes were solid but not as memorable. Braised carrots were tangy and tender; grilled asparagus was ultra-fresh and lightly charred. The menu lists potatoes prepared any number of ways, from gratin to gnocchi, and I went with French fries, which were a disappointment. A killer steak deserves better-than-average frites. Oh, well. Batter-dipped cactus fries, with chipotle dip, were much more interesting.

But, of course, the perfectly cooked steaks held my rapt attention as soon as they hit the table. BLT Steak's signature steaks are broiled at 1,700 degrees, topped with herb butter, and served sizzling in a cast-iron pan with nine difference sauce options, from barbecue to Béarnaise. The sauces were a nice touch — I tried the lip­smacking chimichurri — but honestly, the meat was plenty satisfying unadorned.

A New York strip was deeply caramelized and almost black on the outside, juicy and bright pink on the inside, while a special bone-in filet was luxuriously tender once I cut through the perfectly seasoned crust. Meaty lobster mushrooms and a luscious Périgueux sauce, with Madeira and black truffles, made it utterly seductive. And red wine-braised short ribs were total meat candy — dark, rich, and smoky, with crispy edges that gave way to moist shreds of beef.

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