Meet a Man Who's Offered a $1,000 Finder’s Fee for True Love

I take some pride in being a good matchmaker. I mean, I'm constantly trying to shove single people together — and, every now and then, it actually works. I even set up one of my best friends with the guy she ended up marrying. How cool is that?

So when a woman in my book club mentioned an unusual matchmaking opportunity, I figured it would be a snap.

One of the club's members, Kat, has been friends with a guy named Scott forever. We've all gotten to know Scott through Kat — and as this particular group of friends has grown progressively older and more married, we increasingly live vicariously through Scott's bachelor fun.

But Scott has had enough.

"He's decided he's tired of first dates that go nowhere," Kat reported. "So he's offered a $1,000 finder's fee to any of his friends who finds him a real, successful relationship!"

The excitement in the room became palpable. We all know single women, and we all know Scott — how hard could this be?

Then someone suggested that we could really get to work. "Let's put together of a roster of all the single people we know!" she suggested. "Descriptions, ages, locations. If we all add enough people, we could totally start hooking people up."

I don't know about the rest of them, but I was thinking: Screw the group roster. I'm going to hook Scott up on my own.

I've known this guy for three years, and he's a total catch. And then there's my special aptitude for bringing people together. Did I mention I've already got one wedding under my belt?

I was counting the money already.


Fueled by dreams of an easy payday, I scheduled lunch with Scott the very next week. Scott, I should disclose, is not our bachelor's real name. I don't want any of you sneaky types figuring out who he is and taking the $1,000 for yourselves.

But I can attest to the fact that Scott is a living, breathing bachelor in his early 40s. He is not missing limbs. Nor does he have a family stashed away somewhere. (He was married in his 20s, but it ended without kids.)

He owns a charming bungalow in downtown Phoenix. He's got an engineering degree, an awesome job (which has little to do with engineering), and he is both funny and athletic. I'd always assumed that his single status was a matter of choice.

Not so, he told me, as we inhaled our soul food. Turns out he's tried match.com, eHarmony, you name it. Scott estimates he's gone out with more than 100 women at least once since his divorce.

"I have plenty of dates," he said. "I just hate them."

"You don't hate them," I said, horrified.

"Okay, I don't hate them," he agreed. "I just don't like them." He'd always been leery of letting friends set him up — but after some exceptionally dull evenings, he wondered what he had to lose.

Scott is looking for someone with mojo. "There are all these women wanting for people to create a life for them," he said. He wants someone who's already made one of her own.

He actually has a bit of a list. "I'd like her to have a curiosity about the world, to want to learn and experience new things. Ideally, someone in her 30s who wants to keep active in life. And a biting sense of humor. The banter is important."

None of this sounded too hard.

"I have to find her attractive," he added. "But really, that's the easiest thing to find. It's hard to find women who have a little spunk. A lot of those are taken."

After lunch, I started making a list of my own, this one with eligible females. And that's when it hit me how hard this was going to be.

For one thing, I had a startling small pool of eligible singles. (Taking out the 20-something bimbos and the prematurely bitter, my list was down to four.)

One good possibility is leaving town, and one of Scott's rules is no long-distance relationships. Another friend is way too much of a homebody. No spunk there. A third is hopelessly mired in a screwed-up romance with an ex. If she's waiting to line up a new guy before leaving the old one, how could she possibly fit Scott's criteria of being willing to create a life of her own?

That left Anna (which, again, is not her real name for reasons that will become obvious).

I called her up and gave my sales pitch: Here's this single guy who's smart, funny, successful.

Anna has pestered me for years to find her a nice guy. Years! Yet when I finally had one, she immediately wanted to know how tall he was. When I admitted the answer was 5-foot-8, Anna quickly made an excuse to get off the phone. Damn her.

"You're only 5-4," I pointed out.

"Yeah, but I want to wear heels," she said. "Whoa . . . that's my other line! Call me next week, okay?"

Matchmaking ought to be easy. If people were just a set of data, you could plug in the coordinates and let a computer do the rest. She is 35, 5-foot-4, and smart. He is 45, 5-foot-8, and funny. Ding ding ding!

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10 comments
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Moury Roberts
Moury Roberts

Well I personally think that love can never be purchased by the money or anything. So we should always see that how much love partner has. Both should be with each other by heart not by money.

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Moury Roberts

find attorney<

Karianne
Karianne

Okay so I am one of those readers that is over 30 with no plans to leave phoenix. I have never been married but do have an adult son currently attending college. I would love your help in meeting someone, seems every time I go out I attract only men in their 20's. I am pretty 5'4, Auburn hair, blue eyes, outgoing, smart, awesome sense of humor and pretty. Please Help me!!!

E
E

I chose the wrong career.

Omar Tentmaker
Omar Tentmaker

Sarah: Please forward me your list of "20-something bimbos". Thanks. Omar.

Omar Tentmaker
Omar Tentmaker

Sarah: Please forward me your list of "20-something bimbos". Thanks. Omar.

Phyllistine
Phyllistine

I like to recommend, in general, considering someone it doesn't occur to you to consider, i.e., introduce Scott to someone who, to you, doesn't seem like he'd think she's a great choice. Not because of any of his dealbreaker reasons (people have to figure out on their own which ones of those to abandon), but because you can't see the potential chemistry. Sometimes it works great. (And some of those qualities are a sliding scale. Some people might just be quiet until they meet him, for example.)

Carp
Carp

I have to admit I found this both dead on AND hilarious. Well done. As an also "40 something, succesfull, SHORT" bachelor, the number of times I've heard females "disqualify" a guy based on his height is staggering. Yet I don't blame them, in the grand scheme of things it's probably genetic, going back to prehistoric days and the biggest caveman offering the best protection. In any case, I hope "Scott" finds his true love and that your more discerning friend finds hers. I have a feeling she will lower her standards before he does...

Robyn
Robyn

Well done, SF, well done.

Golda Reuben
Golda Reuben

While I enjoy Fenske's hardhitting articles exposing the crooks in this town, it's nice to see her versatility. The brilliant, witty, incisive writing is a joy to read from the in-depth reporting to the "lighter" stuff. I never know what to expect but I love it all!

BTW, why don't Kat & Scott date? Is she too tall because she seems adorable?

diamondgirl
diamondgirl

I've got 2 weddings and a long term relationship under my match-making belt. I'm making my list of eligible single ladies right now... How picky is this Scott??

 
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