Given the fact that the global economy has hit the skids and funding for any program, whether scientific or arts-related, is dicey, this type of approach, which more than smacks of the corporate, appears especially critical to F.A.R.'s continued existence. Ferguson is uncertain as to whether Diane Halle will be continuing her financial support in the future and opines that F.A.R. will be looking to other funding sources, including private donors, corporate sponsors, and institutional grants. It would be nice to see F.A.R. find some, because the arts community in the Valley can always benefit from an infusion of fresh and off-the-beaten-track ideas to keep its heart healthy. But is F.A.R. the one best for the job?

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1 comments
Mike
Mike

While the critiques of the actual work done by FAR in this article, the author of this article appears to have no intimate familiarity with the purpose of the ASU Foundation which is to orchestrate partnerships between public and private funds. The funds being used to sponsor FAR could not be used for any other purpose by the University besides the purpose for which they were donated and consequently have no effect on the budget for the school itself. If they did, that information would be publicly available because the funds would be state tax dollars. Crow sees "art" as beneficial to all aspects of the community but, admittedly, knows nothing about it. Problematic though that may be, the Phoenix art community is fortunate on some level to have a University President who is actually interested in a relationship. It seems that the Phoenix arts scene, which needs higher levels of community and financial support to remain viable, would be far better served by attempting a level of integration then by running and hiding from a collection of well-funded, connected individuals who would ultimately like to see the Phoenix art scene succeed.

 
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