So far, Dupont says he has not submitted any documents asking for legal fees. However, the county attorney has, according to Gandarilla's office, appealed the case to Superior Court. What, so Smith and MacIntyre can dissemble some more about it?

This stupid bit of retaliation against a minor foe of the sheriff snowballed to the point that two MCSO deputies — at least one of whom should know better — ended up contradicting each other and revealing the contempt with which they view the legal system.

And all for a bogus trespassing case.

Director Pedro Ultreras (left) and Phoenix actor Luis Avila (several pounds lighter) at a recent screening of Ultreras' gripping film, 7 Soles.
Stephen Lemons
Director Pedro Ultreras (left) and Phoenix actor Luis Avila (several pounds lighter) at a recent screening of Ultreras' gripping film, 7 Soles.

SEVEN SUNS

Pedro Ultreras' brutal, uncompromising film 7 Soles (7 Suns), which depicts the plight of a group of migrants crossing the Sonoran Desert is a must-see for all Americans who want to understand the sheer horror some immigrants are willing to endure to come to this country.

In it, director Ultreras, a former reporter for Telemundo and Univision, weaves together true-life tales of migrants trying to make it to the relative safety of a Phoenix drop-house. I saw the film's Phoenix première the other day. The theater was so packed that I and others had to sit on the floor.

Often, depictions of the plight of migrants are melodramatic and one-sided, but 7 Soles was neither. In the film, human smugglers (coyotes), as depicted by Gustavo Sánchez Parra and Phoenix's Luis Avila, are the personifications of thuggishness, selfishness, and criminality. Throughout the film, there are murders, rapes, people left to die in the desert and very little redemption.

If you know Luis Avila, recognizable because of his activism locally and his theater work here (he's the director of the play The Tears of Lives, which I blogged about recently), you may be shocked by his portrayal of the coyote Gavilan. Avila was heavier when the film was shot. His success at making you believe he's capable of numerous, heinous acts is a tribute to his acting chops.

The plot involves Parra's coyote character, Negro, and Avila's character, Gavilan, transporting a group of 15 men, women, and children across the border. Problem is, their route is being closely watched by the U.S. Border Patrol, so the coyotes have to take a more scenic path, so to speak, and that's when the suffering kicks in full blast. If the sun and the scorpions don't get you, dehydration, lack of food and medicine, or violent confrontations with and between the human smugglers, just might.

I should also mention the moving performance of Mexican actress Evangelina Sosa, who portrays a woman crossing with her two small children. Sosa ends up appealing to what little good there is in Negro, though how successful she is, you'll have to find out for yourselves.

I don't want to give away too much, but the drama definitely keeps you on the edge of your seat. Although it's been playing for four months in Mexico, Ultreras explained in a Q&A after the screening that U.S. distribution's been difficult to obtain because the film's in Spanish with English subtitles, and it's hardly the sort of feel-good fare many Americans prefer.

That's too bad, because I'm certain this movie could find a wider audience, particularly in Arizona, because much of the film was shot in the desert and in Phoenix, where 100 extras were used in a drop-house scene.

The première and a subsequent screening were benefits for No More Deaths/No Mas Muertes. Currently, the film has no regular engagement in the United States, but there will be another screening at 6:30 p.m. September 3 at Harkins Arizona Mills to benefit the Macehualli Day Labor Center. Admission will be $10, and Ultreras will be there for a Q&A afterwards.

Although Ultreras is looking to show the film elsewhere in the Phoenix area, he has no guarantees, so I urge everyone with an interest in the subject, or just in seeing a gripping piece of filmmaking, to check it out.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
4 comments
Venice
Venice

This is really admired for providing wonderful information on this blog with brand-new information. I've found this very valuable. Your post is great! pretty much sure lot of your readers had a great knowledge after they read your post. Thank you so much for sharing this!

Vernice

My blog : http://www.pianodecuisson.net

TommyC
TommyC

It just doesn't make sense that MacIntyre would resort to telling the truth when he can just make something up and the court is expected to believe it.

All this time I thought perjury was a crime. If he testified that he didn't advise Smith and didn't even know who the defendant is, and then Smith testified that he did and did, then someone is lying. Of course it must be Deputy Smith. No one in MCSO command staff would perjure themselves, would they? Oh hell no...

Normnip
Normnip

Hey Birdbrain,

Since you think that Chris B. was a coward for carrying a loaded rifle while the president was here, prove it at the next real opportunity and you carry a real, loaded rifle around without acting or even feeling scared.

I thought so. You need to use your journalistics skills to find the truth. All you're doing is starting with your hoplophobic and political fears and then rationalizing them.

It's transparent you're an emotional, liberal, political activist posing as a thoughtful, objective, hardworking journalist whose looking for and reporting the truth as best as he can find it.

I hadn't read the New Times in a long while. Thanks to your article I now remember why.

Orlando's Kindergarden teacher
Orlando's Kindergarden teacher

As Orlando's Kindergarden teacher that I am very disappointed but not surprised at Orlando's premeditated "criminal Trespassing".I still remember Orlando, a quiet child who kept to himself.� I asked all my students to draw pictures of what they wanted to do when they grew up. The sweet, innocent children drew themselves as fireman or police, dog catchers and soldiers. One was a spaceman. But Orlando drew elaborate drawings of himself on county property in handcuffs. I was very troubled by this and asked him what it meant. He told me he wanted to be "a criminal trespasser" when he grew up. This was very disturbing. In fact, the details were haunting. With every detail clearly drawn out and using only 2 basic crayollas (I gave the more elaborate crayons to the white kids because I was certain the Mexicans would steal them) There it was, his future as a criminal trespasser in full detail. He drew himself standing with on foot on the sidewalk and the other defiantly on county property. Two men with ski masks were grabbing him. You could see little tents with bars in the background. As puzzled as this was, I asked Orlando one question: How will they know to arrest you? He said he planned on protesting every day in front of the sheriff's luxury office suite that will cost the tax payers millions. I was disgusted." How dare you question the Sheriff or his business" I scolded.

I only wish I would've acted sooner to stop this horrendous crime from taking place. Just because our wonderful Sheriff Joe advertises that he will be doing an public prisoner march with 200 Mexicans in chains to the world and invites the media and public to attend in Roman fashion without taping off any areas of county property doesn't mean Orlando couldn't have been stopped and those pebbles under Nike wouldn't have been left for only more suitable feet to step on.

My apologies to the world. I should've reported this years ago lest he "criminally Trespass" again. Never mind the unserved warrants or uninvestigated rapes. We need to go after the Orlando's of the world.

 
Phoenix Concert Tickets
Loading...