Stephen Steinbrink, a.k.a. French Quarter, Is Hyper-Productive

Valley singer-songwriter Stephen Steinbrink wears many caps. Not just in the obvious sense — though Steinbrink is rarely seen without his trademark trucker cap or feathered Peter-Pan style headgear — but in the sense that though many Phoenix artists are content to sit around bitching about the state of the scene, Steinbrink seems consumed at all times with creating. In addition to a remarkable deluge of EPs, tapes, LPs, and split releases under his name and the band name French Quarter, he is a prolific cartoonist, blogger, and amateur filmmaker. He makes his living on the road, crisscrossing America, hawking his wares at all-ages venues, house shows, and art galleries. His work has caught the attention of independent tastemakers at Web sites like Coke Machine Glow and Tiny Mix Tapes. Perhaps his biggest coup was seeing his debut album, French Quarter, reviewed by Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore and legendary music critic Byron Coley in an issue of hipster bible Arthur Magazine.

"It feels good," Steinbrink says with a laugh. "But I'm always trying to avoid getting complacent. I'm always trying to one-up myself."

Steinbrink's new record, Next New Sun, does exactly that, melding the sparse folk-pop of earlier releases with spacey dynamics, MIDI string sections, and expansive percussion. All the strengths of a fantastic singer-songwriter record are present — the emotive, cryptic lyrics, the gorgeous melodies — without any of the self-indulgence that often strikes solo projects of the sort. Details like the disco-guitar break of "Bold With Fire Pt. 2," the grating train-track loop of the title track, and guest vocalist Katherine Steinbrink's contributions on "I Really Want (To Be Your Friend)" keep the record varied and surprising, something not often found in the music typical one-man acts. The record will be available on CD and LP later this year on Tempe-based Gilgongo Records, but Steinbrink is releasing on October 1 a special VHS edition of the album that pairs the songs with short films and music videos.

Stephen Steinbrink hides behind the name French Quarter.
Courtesy of Stephen Steinbrink
Stephen Steinbrink hides behind the name French Quarter.

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French Quarter is scheduled to perform on Tuesday, September 29.
Ye Olde Bike Saviours House in Tempe

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Steinbrink started playing music in the early 2000s, goofing around with a guitar the way most nascent musicians do. "I played guitar in junior high jazz band, and just screwed around, listened to a lot of Beatles records." It was getting a four-track tape machine for his 14th birthday that solidified his interest in music. "I spent a lot of time just learning about how to make things sound right," he says. He started playing guitar in Black Feet, an "old timey, really dark folk" combo. "We toured a little bit," Steinbrink says. "It's funny, because I went on that first tour, and I hated it. Absolutely hated it. I couldn't stand it. I never would have imagined that's what I'd end up doing so much of." After Black Feet disbanded in 2005, Steinbrink began writing songs under the name French Quarter, inspired after seeing the words on a friend's New Orleans souvenir shirt. "I just liked the way it looked spelled out."

Steinbrink started self-releasing CD-Rs when his friend John Ryan approached him about putting out a tape on Ryan's label Workout Tapes. Steinbrink began playing out a lot and started working under Bob Hoag's tutelage at Hoag's Flying Blanket Studios. "That ended kinda badly," Steinbrink says. "So after that, I was just confused and lost and disenchanted with things for a while. Then I just got the idea to quit my job, move out, and just tour constantly. Which is what I've done since then." Not long after his decision, James Fella, owner of Gilgongo Records, used his national distribution to put out the self-titled French Quarter debut record.

"James is one of my best friends," Steinbrink says. "So I was really excited to release the record with him. It was a strange kind of ordeal, though. I spent three months recording that album and then eight months mixing it." Steinbrink recorded the record using Garage Band, which presented a challenge because it was the first time he used digital instead of analog recording. The record hardly shows the signs of its being a novice effort, which is even more remarkable given the fact that Steinbrink recorded it with little more than an Apple laptop's onboard microphone. "Considering everything, I'm really proud of how it turned out."

While touring with Teague Cullen's Foot Ox, whose song "Beauty Will Prevail" is featured on Next New Sun, Steinbrink found himself in New Orleans and in hot water with a promoter.

"This guy was pissed at me about the band name. He said, 'You know, no one is coming to the show because of your band name.' Which is funny, because about 100 people showed up that night. No one was angry, like that guy. But everyone asked me about the name, considering that I'd never even been to New Orleans. It was just a stupid, unfounded band name. I just felt since the band is just me, it made sense to go under my own name."

Steinbrink recorded his next release for Gilgongo, Ugly Unknowns, without the French Quarter moniker. The record featured some of his most direct lyrics. Songs like "South of 13th" chronicled his thoughts about playing music professionally, while tracks like "I Don't Want to Get Stabbed" and "I Don't Ever Want to Die" grappled with mortality, poignant thoughts most likely inspired by late-night walks in downtown Phoenix. The record received mixed reviews. Though some (including this writer, who reviewed the record for Tiny Mix Tapes) found the album a brave assertion of personal identity, others took umbrage with the confessional tone, labeling it "childish."

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1 comments
Brittany Gould
Brittany Gould

really, stephen steinbrink is so incredible! i am so amazed! everything he does turns to gold!

 
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