In its five years of life, the group has had more hits than misses. I think that's due to a certain distance from the people who are making art locally. Just look at the board of MPAC: There's not a single artist on the list.

Instead, there's a representative from APS, from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Arizona, from the Salt River Project. There are accountants (three), developers (two), and even the CEO of a corporate recruiting firm.

It's not surprising, in light of that, that in its five years of life, MPAC has done little to encourage actual art. Indeed, even though the non-profit says it exists to promote the "creative community," it's invested most of its capital in weird projects.

Yes, it's given $10,000 to the Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation. But it spent 15 times that — $155,340 — to hire a Swiss firm to help "brand" the Phoenix area, according to its most recent tax return. (The Swiss apparently feel that Phoenix is an "opportunity oasis." Okay — now what?)

As part of its branding project, MPAC commissioned a whole bunch of studies. We now have studies to tell us that people don't think Phoenix is as cool as Austin or Seattle. We have studies to say we spend less on the arts than similar big cities.

Last year, MPAC spent $566,842 on its "Reaching New Audiences" program — culminating in studies concluding that the Latino community is an "untapped" audience for fine arts.

How much better to have spent that money on grants for emerging Latino artists?

I suppose these expenses aren't, technically, any of my business. MPAC is privately funded, likely by the same giant corporations that provide its board members. If APS or even SRP wants to spend its charitable contributions on projects this silly, well, that's up to them.

But it's an entirely different issue when we taxpayers are about to be wooed as potential donors.

It's fair to note that this tax would hardly affect the average citizen: One penny for every $10 is not a lot, especially since food purchases are exempt.

But a sales tax increase is the most regressive kind of tax increase imaginable, as any economist can tell you. It hits poor workers much harder than wealthy ones, simply because the poor have no choice but to spend a larger portion of income on purchases.

Speaking on behalf of my fellow working stiffs here, I can tell you that we're not entirely without compassion. A majority of Arizonans, I suspect, would vote for Governor Brewer's tax increase if only she could ever get the Legislature to refer it to the ballot. Most of us hate to see the cuts coming out of the (now-mortgaged) Capitol building. We care about the poor.

So as much as I personally feel pinched by stagnating wages and escalating expenses, if Governor Brewer asks me to help out, I will. If she wants one extra penny for every dollar I spend, I'll give it to her.

But even though MPAC plans to ask for one-tenth of that — just one-tenth of a penny for every dollar — they can count me out.

I've got bills to pay. I'm worried about the people in Haiti and the kids in South Phoenix. And I've got no interest in subsidizing the corporate recruitment strategies for a bunch of developers and accountants.

Let them eat their cake. When it comes to this ill-conceived tax plan, I'll hang on to my crumbs.

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10 comments
SunDevilRick
SunDevilRick

Nancy,I don't support this tax at all but I give Thousands of dollars every year to the arts, I volunteer with arts organizations and I buy art that I like. My not supporting this poorly thought out, poorly planned and poorly timed tax does not "deprive others of the nourishment that arts and culture brings." In reality the people that choose not to go and support the arts deprive themselves. I think it matters more to personal development and appreciation when people go and become a patron of the arts in their own way and on their own time. When someone is forced to do something that is good for them they tend to resent it.

In the end the primary reason why I don't support this is that it is about as poorly timed as President Obama's spending freeze. You don't take $ out of people's pockets in a recession. From either end.

Nancy
Nancy

A small tax to support arts and cultural organizations (from musuems to zoos to theatres) will help sustain the very capable and talented artists employed at these institutions. A small tax to support arts and cultural organizations across the state will provide amenities that make it more affordable to attend cultural events. A small tax to support arts and cultural in Arizona is innovative, significant, and will inspire our children to stay, visitors to come, and businesses to innovate. This small tax initiaitve is big-hearted, largely-envisioned, and completely enterprising. It is those against paying even a small share towards sustaining this State's treasures that not only are deprived, but deprive others of the nourishment that arts and culture brings.

Roro
Roro

Sounds like bourgeoisie business as usual.

Marcy
Marcy

"if Governor Brewer asks me to help out, I will. If she wants one extra penny for every dollar I spend, I'll give it to her."

So what's stopping you? Write her a check today.

SundevilRick
SundevilRick

A "more vibrant 'scene'" won't come from Tax dollars. It will come from landlords keeping rent low and not selling out to huge high rise condos. It will come from people buying the art that is on sale at things like first friday. It will come from people going to all the beloved spots like the Phoenix Zoo. We can dump all the tax dollars in the world into Arts organizations but in the end if people are not showing up and buying/ supporting what is already here it is never going to make this a "vibrant scene." Donations to the arts, and charities in general, are way down as a whole. How do you think a tax will help that? People will think "Hey I already give via my taxes so I don't have to give again." When you introduce a new tax this is how people think at first, and for a few years until they forget that they are paying the tax.

Stop asking for a task and go find a piece of art you like and buy it. I don't care if it is a "Cowboy" piece from Scottsdale or some Avant Guarde modernist piece you buy at first friday. That is where a vibrant scene comes from!

And if you can't spend money to buy art, volunteer your time and expertise to an arts group, museum or the zoo. Until enough people step up and do something in their own community for the arts it is not going to matter if a tax is in place. People make a vibrant arts community, not taxes.

Kevin
Kevin

Not only would this minimal sales tax help improve arts organizations across the entire state, it would also go towards other institutions that are dearly beloved and attended by many citizens and visitors, including the Phoenix Zoo, Reid Park Zoo in Tucson, the Desert Botanical Garden, the Sonoran Desert Museum and the Arizona Science Center.

And, to me, it's really not about helping struggling arts organizations... It's more about making Arizona a more vibrant place to live.

Look at Denver. What used to be a "cowtown" is now a highly competitive place for new business and for new residents. Denver passed a tax such as this years ago.

Don't be short-sighted here. This would ONLY be good for Arizona. If indeed this 10% population erosion is true (which I seriously doubt), having a more vibrant "scene" in Arizona would help this tremendously.

Gretchen
Gretchen

Arizona has lost 10% of its population base?? What?? That's not true. Did anyone fact check this article?

SundevilRick
SundevilRick

What do you call involvement by other organizations? MPAC has presented to other organizations but they seemed to pop out of the woodwork here in the Phoenix area. They have No plan as to how this money would be dolled out to organizations, how it would be safe guarded in budget cuts, and they didn't have any polling from within 6 months on if it would pass. This is a TAX in a bad economy. That is a bad idea right now. I love the idea for more funding for the arts but pigs will fly before Arizona voters will pass this TAX during this economy. Also they just theorize that arts and culture will bring more businesses and "highly skilled workers" to the state. They were not able to prove this beyond pointing to Austin and Seattle. Both of these cities had large arts and culture populations for years before they saw they pay off. How long does MPAC theorize AZ will have to wait? Also who else would this initiative serve but existing organizations? Of course it will help them but at what cost right now? And who decides which organization gets what? There is no structure to speak of, and in this economy you need more than lofty ideals to pass a TAX! And, by the way, right now Arizona can't afford to keep its parks open, so there is now way that Arizonans can afford to pass this.

Jessica Andrews
Jessica Andrews

It doesn't seem to me that the writer of this article did much research. If she had, she would have found that not just MPAC has been involved in this effort. Many people (both inside and outside of the arts and cultural community) have been involved for a number of years in careful and responsible preparation for this initiative. Thanks to the leadership of the business and foundation community, it was possible to learn a great deal about the impact arts and culture have in Arizona and that citizens view arts and culture to be important in their lives and in the lives of their children. Arts and culture creates an environment that will attract highly skilled workers to our state as well as having a huge impact on the state's economy through the employment of hundreds of arts and cultural workers who pay taxes and the many purchases that are made locally by arts and cultural organizations. Isn't this a good thing? It has been proven that children who are involved in the arts do better in school and, with the severe cuts that our schools are facing, arts organizations are providing creative activities that many schools can no longer provide themselves. We want to be proud of our state. We rank so low nationally in so many areas that it would be nice to be near the top of the list when this initiative passes. The initiative isn't about subsidizing existing progtrams. It will truly be transformative for organizations across the state and will serve many more Arizonans with free and low cost access to arts and cultural activities not possible now. This is an amazing opportunity that Arizona cannot afford to pass up.

 
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