Bennett advised us to obtain a copy of History of Man and decide for ourselves whether Scientology is fact or fiction, but he sensed our skepticism.

"Unfortunately, you will never know the truth, and all the info you will get will be from those who are so unethical that they would sell their souls to the devil to either make money or make themselves right," Bennett wrote in an e-mail. "Either way, the truth is the truth and will remain that way regardless of how some try to discredit it and make it so 'weird' that it will keep others away. The funny joke is that [your] type of article actually pulls in more people."

We would agree with Bennett that History of Man, with its emphasis on the past lives of clams, is a fine place to get a taste of Scientology. Yet Bennett says "all the info" we might get on Scientology comes from unethical, evil, money-making sources.

The chaplain may have something there — at least about the information that comes from the church.

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10 comments
cactusrich
cactusrich

How the New Times can write articles about Scientology and miss the real point is beyond me.  Unless the real purpose is to distort and falisfy.  I am always tempted to assume that your writers are simply jealous of a writing talent that put Hubbard on the NYT best sellers list several times and garnered him acolades around the world. Ever think of mentioning that?  Hubbard never had to tear people down in his writings to be a success as a writer.  A point that seems to be lost on the PNT.

 

A world without war and without crime where man is free to rise to greater heights are the oft-stated goals of Scientology and Hubbard's research and writings.  Detractors of any worthwhile purpose will always exist but to focus on them is, as I say, to miss the point.

 

People should read the original work, be it Dianetics , Fundamentals of Thought or some other book  by Hubbard, and make up their own mind.  These books are available in bookstores and libraries which evidently found it worthwhile to put them on the shelves over the past 40 years or so.. 

 

My suggestion to you is to find out for yourself, not through the pages of a newspaper or some TV show.  Read a book written by Hubbard. You just might be pleasantly surprised what you discover.

buttersquash
buttersquash

 @cactusrich Agreed.  Start out with History of Man, and you will instantly realize how guano crazy this nonsensical "religion" is.

Margaret2011
Margaret2011

Russell Miller's bio on Hubbard is an antagonistic treatment, and doesn't do Hubbard or his philosophy much justice.  I would recommend the book I mentioned below ("The Phoenix Lectures") for the curious and neutrally minded. 

Margaret2011
Margaret2011

Actually, an excellent book on Scientology is called "The Phoenix Lectures".  As the title suggests, it's based on some lectures that Hubbard gave in 1954 in Phoenix.  The book goes into the philosophical underpinnings of Scientology, as well as some historical influences, and may give readers an idea of why people might be attracted to the subject, if not the organization.  The book is out of print these days, but I've seen old versions listed for pennies on ebay. Definitely worth a read for the curious.

pimacountyaz
pimacountyaz

Much history missing from piece. Dianetics was actually invented in Pasadena, CA near JPL @senyorreporter Scientology was founded in Phoenix

Harold
Harold

The Aberree newsletter was published by a Phoenix Scientology couple in the 1950's, it was used by Anderson as a history source of Scientology for The Master script.

http://www.aberree.com/

BosonStark
BosonStark like.author.displayName 1 Like

Russell Miller generously allowed his out-of-print bio of Hubbard to be in free online and downloadable versions:

 

http://www.spaink.net/cos/rmiller/index.html

 

Keep in mind Miller's bio is the real bio of Hubbard, not the absurd propaganda put out by this cult.

 

In addition to people regaining perfect eyesight after reading or doing Dianetics, several members testified that you could grow a third set of perfect teeth. I have researched this 3rd set of teeth phenomena and when it does occur, the teeth are merely boney protuberances that usually have to be removed surgically, because they are not functional.

 

Hubbard claimed that Dianetics could cure 80% of all diseases, and that he had the secrets to "controlling the aging process." Hubbard died at 74, a physical and mental wreck, because he needed to get to the implant station on Mars to continue his research there, to help the Martians extend their lives, or something like that.

 

Sometimes Hubbard's ideas are so idiotic it is painful to contemplate that people take them seriously.

SpenBen
SpenBen

Wow!  This sounds so like what Joseph Smith did back in the 1820's!   It's comic book cosmology and blue sky!

 

 
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