And for those wanting to forgo the pork altogether, there's the chicken inasal. No ordinary grilled fowl, what makes this tender piece of moist meat interesting is its lush marinade of lemongrass, garlic, ginger, lemon, vinegar, and Sprite in addition to a brushing of achuete (annatto seeds) oil. Soliman tells me the secret of its success is to marinade the chicken overnight and then freeze it until it's ready to be prepared.

At the end of the meal, don't miss the traditional Filipino parfait halo-halo. This mixture of shaved ice and evaporated milk added to sweet beans, bananas, yam, coconut meat, and sugar palm fruit, then topped with purple yam ice cream and a piece of leche flan, is a sweet and creamy dessert you won't soon forget come next summer. And when it's mixed together, the colorful concoction, served in a tall, clear plastic cup, is an eye-popping, slurp-worthy treat of the inner-child kind.

With an abundance of pork, rice, and dishes spiked with vinegar, garlic, and soy sauce, there's more to Filipino food than the bizarre.
Jackie Mercandetti
With an abundance of pork, rice, and dishes spiked with vinegar, garlic, and soy sauce, there's more to Filipino food than the bizarre.

Location Info

Map

Manila Sunrise Gourmet

2121 W. Guadalupe Road
Mesa, AZ 85202

Category: Restaurant > Gourmet

Region: Mesa

Details

Manila Sunrise Gourmet
2121 West Guadalupe Road, Mesa
480-491-5070
Hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily

Crispy dinuguan: $6.99
Pansit palabok: $5.99
Chicken inasal: $5.99
Lechon kawali: $6.99

Given the assimilation problem of Filipino food in America, the leftover deli décor on the walls of Manila Sunrise — a Route 66 sign, a 1950s rock 'n' roll guitar — seem outright comical amid the condiment counter sporting fish sauce, vinegar, and banana ketchup and a television tuned to a Filipino cable channel. Soliman's Filipino customers barely seem to notice. They're too busy sitting down for a meal at one of the few scattered tables, waiting in line at the turo-turo for dishes like adobo (fall-apart pork braised in vinegar, garlic, and soy sauce) and the vegetable dish, pinakbet, or grabbing an order of crispy pata (deep fried pork knuckle) to go.

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2 comments
mremir
mremir

Laura, the Philippine province mentioned is spelled "Pampanga", not "Pompanga". Great article. I agree about the underwhelming prescence of Filipino eateries here in Arizona, especially the valley. I'll definitely check this place out.

wlion517
wlion517


just as Esther responded I am dazzled that someone can profit $9300 in one month on the computer. did you look at this link qwe13

 
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