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  • Article

    Deja Wow: Red, White and Snooze

    According to artist Hans Haacke, all art becomes purely nostalgic after a period of ten years. Haacke's own 1991 mixed-media sculpture "Collateral," included in Phoenix Art Museum's "Old Glory: The American Flag in Contemporary Art," falls premature ...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on April 4, 1996
  • Article

    Intriguing Entertainment

    Inspector, I confess! I love stage mysteries and thrillers. From the time, as a youngster, I saw the film classic Witness for the Prosecution--based on Agatha Christie's play--I've been guilty of harboring a secret thrill for the mechanical intri...

    by Marshall W. Mason on April 4, 1996
  • Article

    Seasons Bleatings

    Safely ensconced in its comfortable new home in a strip mall at 99th Avenue and Peoria Avenue, Theater Works is presenting Robert Bolt's turgid, talky historical pageant A Man for All Seasons. In its new location, the theatre has painstakingly reprod...

    by Marshall W. Mason on April 4, 1996
  • Article

    Video Village

    Deposit all linear thinking at the shadowy portals of "Buried Secrets," Bill Viola's five-part, multimedia installation at ASU Art Museum at Nelson Fine Arts Center. That's because this potent visual and auditory experience is consciously designed to...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on March 21, 1996
  • Article

    Tenure Mercies

    When the two cast members in Actors Theatre of Phoenix's production of David Mamet's Oleanna start talking to each other in act one, it sounds forced. Away they chatter in the herky-jerky verbal rhythms for which Mamet is so celebrated, finishing eac...

    by M.V. Moorhead on March 21, 1996
  • Article

    Shaw Girl

    It's doubtful that any country ever produced finer socialists than those of Great Britain--of the literary sort, at least. Perhaps because the class system is so plainly laid out on that little island, writers like Shaw and Orwell could oppose, even ...

    by M.V. Moorhead on March 14, 1996
  • Article

    Persecution Complex

    When Martin Sherman's play Bent premiered in England in 1977, the plight of homosexuals in the Holocaust was a little-discussed episode of the century's history. In the two decades since, the pink triangle which gays were made to wear in the concentr...

    by M.V. Moorhead on March 7, 1996
  • Article

    Getting Over Ansel

    "Image Conscious," a juried photography show geared toward altered and experimental work, proves yet again that there's viable photographic life after Ansel Adams and his arcane Zone System--and that it's alive, well and being shown in, of all places...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on February 29, 1996
  • Article

    Tennessee in Mexico

    "Nothing human disgusts me, unless it's unkind or violent." So remarks Hannah Jelkes, the spinster-paragon of The Night of the Iguana. She could be speaking for her creator, Tennessee Williams. That's very likely just what Williams had in mind--readi...

    by M.V. Moorhead on February 29, 1996
  • Article

    Weird Science

    Phoenix Theatre's moving Arizona premiere of Miss Evers' Boys puts achingly human faces on a truly brutal episode of American racism. The year is 1932, and a group of black men in Macon County, Alabama, is chosen for a seemingly benevolent gover...

    by Gerald Thomson on February 29, 1996
  • Article

    Webb Design - The good, the bad and the boring of Del Webb's New River development

    When Del Webb Corporation brought plans for its huge New River development to Maricopa County for approval early last year, the ensuing donnybrook was about as lively and entertaining as land planning gets. On one side was Del Webb, assuring the...

    by Edward Lebow on February 22, 1996
  • Article

    Short-Attention-Span Theatre

    One-act plays aren't produced often, and that's ironic given that the half-hour television sitcom has become America's most popular dramatic form. That may be why the latest Black Theatre Troupe offering is so refreshing. Its current evening of oneac...

    by Gerald Thomson on February 22, 1996
  • Article

    Cast From a Different Mold

    If you are desperate for some postmodern deconstruction or hankering for angst-ridden art, don't bother to stop in at Lisa Sette Gallery to see "In the Garden," the current exhibition of sculptural and two-dimensional mixed-media work by Valley artis...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on February 15, 1996
  • Article

    Rioters' Cramp

    In August of 1991, in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, a car carrying Lubavitcher Jewish leader Menachem Schneerson ran into two children, killing a Guyanese-American boy. Brooklyn erupted into a race riot accompanied by an explosive public dialogue that rap...

    by Gerald Thomson on February 8, 1996
  • Article

    Tale From the Crypt

    Anyone who believes that ancient Greek theatre must be stuffy and boring should take in Planet Earth Multi-Cultural Theatre's production of Antigone. He or she will find a rare and rewarding confluence of classic and experimental theatre. Antigo...

    by Gerald Thomson on February 1, 1996
  • Article

    Damsels in This Dress

    Remember when live theatre was an event, a special occasion? Just as I was beginning to fear that those days were gone, along comes a troupe called In Mixed Company, which takes a good evening of theatre, Five Women Wearing the Same Dress, and turns ...

    by Gerald Thomson on January 25, 1996
  • Article

    You'll Fall to Pieces

    Patsy Cline remains a top-selling artist more than 30 years after her death. The 1985 biographical movie Sweet Dreams (starring Jessica Lange), recent videos about her life and music, and the release of a greatest-hits album in 1992 (it sold more tha...

    by Gerald Thomson on January 25, 1996
  • Article

    Geek Theatre

    Let's hope you never have a houseguest like the one currently visiting Theater Works, which is presenting Larry Shue's uproarious comedy The Nerd. This guest is a nerd in the traditional sense--taped glasses, a pocket protector, and toilet paper...

    by Gerald Thomson on January 18, 1996
  • Article

    The Joy of Rex

    With a play first performed almost 2,500 years ago, Southwest Shakespeare Company provides the opportunity to transcend the ages by bringing to life the nightmarish story Oedipus Rex. One of Sophocles' Theban plays, Oedipus is the well-known sto...

    by Gerald Thomson on January 18, 1996
  • Article

    The Simple Simon

    Neil Simon, the most prolific comic playwright of our day, is a household name. Even those who don't attend theatre know him through movies such as The Odd Couple and Barefoot in the Park. But few people have heard of Neil's older brother, Danny. ...

    by Gerald Thomson on January 11, 1996
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Phoenix's Sunnyslope Neighborhood in Danger of Losing its Quirky Character Phoenix's Sunnyslope Neighborhood in Danger of Losing its Quirky Character

This might be a story about the beginning of the end of Sunnyslope as we know it. Call it the Dumbing Down of Mayberry, or How We Lost Another Round… More >>

Choking Hazard: Legos Come to the Heard Museum Choking Hazard: Legos Come to the Heard Museum

The Legos are back. And, once again, these colorful interlocking plastic bricks and mini-figures are housed at a local museum — this time at the Heard, in an exhibition called… More >>

Actors Theatre Delivers with <i>The Book Club Play</i> and <i>The Cottage</i> Actors Theatre Delivers with The Book Club Play and The Cottage

Summer is not yet half over, and we are hot and tired and want a chilled beverage. If we must be entertained, we want simple amusements, please, Beckett can wait… More >>

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