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  • Article

    MONKEE SEE, MONKEE REDUXNO LONGER THE YOUNG GENERATION, ROCK'S PREFAB FOUR'S STILL GOT SOMETHING TO SAY

    Let's think back to the summer of 1986, when it was only 20 years ago to the day that the Monkees first said, "Hey, hey!" Concertgoers at the Jones Beach Theater in New York were doing their customary hanging out in the parking lot before the...

    by Serene Dominic on November 24, 1994
  • Article

    ROOFLESS PEOPLE

    Putting features on the faceless hordes of homeless that roam the streets and back alleys of urban America is the goal of Galeria Mesa's juried exhibition "Going Home-less." The show successfully dredges up some real humanity, with some very ...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on October 27, 1994
  • Article

    POSTCARD FROM THE EDGE

    The theatre as an art form seems to be receding from relevance to our lives. With the exception of Tony Kushner's epic Angels in America, plays about contemporary problems have yielded to film as the art form of preference in our contemporary...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 27, 1994
  • Article

    BLACK LIKE SHE

    The October 10 cover of Time magazine boldly proclaims the advent of a black renaissance here in America. The cover declares that "African-American artists are truly free at last"--at least in an aesthetic sense. But photographer Ren?e Cox,...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on October 20, 1994
  • Article

    TWIN, PACE AND SHOW

    Presumed by many to be Shakespeare's first play, The Comedy of Errors is a terrible comedy. Based on an ancient Roman farce written by Plautus 1,800 years or so before Shakespeare, the plot is so mechanical and the exposition so cumbersome, i...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 20, 1994
  • Article

    SIS AND VINEGAR

    An injudicious case of grand larceny is taking place at Dial Corporate Center's Playhouse on the Park in downtown Phoenix. It might be termed "Crimes of the Art." The occasion is Phoenix Theatre's production of Beth Henley's 1981 Pulit...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 20, 1994
  • Article

    FREEZE FRAME

    When audiences went to Peter Greenaway's 1989 film The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, expecting to see a sexy comedy in a restaurant, they were perhaps among the most unprepared audiences in film history. Rather than a knockabout farce, Gr...

    by Robert Koeler on October 13, 1994
  • Article

    STACKING THE DECADENT

    Stacking the Decadent The Academy Award-winning movie Cabaret is available at your local video store (even supermarket), with career-defining performances by Joel Grey, Liza Minnelli and Michael York. So why not snuggle up with some microwave popco...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 29, 1994
  • Article

    PRAYER BOOK

    If overheated histrionics is your bag, Dingo Troupe's production of A Prayer for My Daughter delivers a fix to satisfy the most insatiable melodrama junkie. The first play by Thomas Babe, a protege of the late Public Theater impresario...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 29, 1994
  • Article

    GLAZED AND CONFUSED

    Neither rain nor smog nor threat of armed insurrection can keep any really hard-core Mexican folk art aficionado, including me (and, at one time, Nelson Rockefeller), from tracking down the objects of this insane aesthetic obsession. Recent...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on September 22, 1994
  • Article

    REVOLTING DEVELOPMENT

    Mutilated human corpses pile up in Port-au-Prince, severed body parts strew the roads of Rwanda, blood flows in Bosnia to cleanse Yugoslavia of ethnic impurity. Even on the eve of an invasion, ruthless dictators cling to power in the name ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 22, 1994
  • Article

    MASQUER PIECE THEATRE

    The Phantom of the Opera is not just a musical. It is an industry. Written by the richest man in the theatre, Andrew Lloyd Webber, and produced by the second-richest man in the theatre, Cameron Mackintosh, Phantom has been marketed to Phoenix...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 15, 1994
  • Article

    DIAPER WRATH

    In the preface to a collection of his plays, author Christopher Durang fondly recalls the famous I Love Lucy episode in which Little Ricky is born. This show prompted Durang to pattern his first play, written in the second grade, after the story. Sin...

    by Kathleen Ellison on September 8, 1994
  • Article

    CHILLY RECEPTION

    A play about Antarctica seems like a good antidote for the summer heat in Phoenix. But Terra Nova, the story of the 1911 race for the South Pole, trades one hell for another. Playwright Ted Tally uses the death of one of Britain's most cherished hero...

    by Kathleen Ellison on September 8, 1994
  • Article

    SEND UP THE CLOWNS

    After seeing the latest version of Forbidden Broadway, I left Herberger Theater Center depressed. My reaction was like the one I had when a shock jock started telling jokes about the homeless. His routine was clever, all right, but wasn't the subject...

    by Kathleen Ellison on August 4, 1994
  • Article

    CANADA DRY

    In 1992, the world celebrated--or at least acknowledged--the quincentennial of America's discovery by Italian explorer Christopher Columbus. During that glorious year, open season was declared on good ol' Chris and on those who followed in his wake. ...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on July 28, 1994
  • Article

    FIN AND YANG

    "Fish Out Of Water," Mesa Southwest Museum's summer art show, is about the closest I've gotten to baiting a hook in 30 years. That's when my father gave up trying to convert me to the church of fishing--and also gave up dragging me, kicking and screa...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on June 29, 1994
  • Article

    CARRY IT BACK TO OLD VIRGINNY

    After seeing the works on paper in the latest group show being hosted by MARS Gallery, a snide adage pops to mind: "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach." Imported from Richmond, Virginia's 1708 Gallery, a well-established artists' cooperative...

    by Kathleen Vanesian on June 15, 1994
  • Article

    GAEL FORCE

    The title of Widows' Peak, a comic mystery set in Ireland in the 1920s, refers to a sort of colony of happy widows. It's a high hill which overlooks the town of Kilshannon, and upon which, by some vaguely explained decree of antiquity, only widows ar...

    by M.V. Moorhead on June 15, 1994
  • Article

    VALLEY ART HOSTS SECOND GAY AND LESBIAN FILM FESTIVAL

    Valley Art Theatre in Tempe opens the Second Annual Gay and Lesbian Film Festival on Friday. The festival consists of four features and a collection of shorts, all of which are more intriguing than anything new you're likely to see at the multiplexes...

    by M.V. Moorhead on June 15, 1994
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Phoenix's Sunnyslope Neighborhood in Danger of Losing its Quirky Character Phoenix's Sunnyslope Neighborhood in Danger of Losing its Quirky Character

This might be a story about the beginning of the end of Sunnyslope as we know it. Call it the Dumbing Down of Mayberry, or How We Lost Another Round… More >>

Choking Hazard: Legos Come to the Heard Museum Choking Hazard: Legos Come to the Heard Museum

The Legos are back. And, once again, these colorful interlocking plastic bricks and mini-figures are housed at a local museum — this time at the Heard, in an exhibition called… More >>

Actors Theatre Delivers with <i>The Book Club Play</i> and <i>The Cottage</i> Actors Theatre Delivers with The Book Club Play and The Cottage

Summer is not yet half over, and we are hot and tired and want a chilled beverage. If we must be entertained, we want simple amusements, please, Beckett can wait… More >>

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