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  • Article

    WINGED VICTORY

    The most important theatre event of this decade, Tony Kushner's epic masterpiece Angels in America, has arrived in Phoenix. It is the largest and deepest play since Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? hit Broadway in 1962, and joins A Streetcar Named ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 28, 1995
  • Article

    RED ROCK TEST

    When I first moved to the Valley two years ago, I did the expected thing--I made a visit to Sedona. I was interested in the town for many reasons: the allure of the name, which comes from Sedona Schnebly, who founded the town with husband Carl in 190...

    by Bettie Rinehart on September 21, 1995
  • Article

    AUNTIE ESTABLISHMENT

    Theater Works is turning out its annual miracle: a great, bloated Broadway musical on a tiny stage in a barn. The occasion is its revival of Jerry Herman's Mame, featuring 156 costumes and a sterling star turn. When the literati debate the virtues ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 21, 1995
  • Article

    ACT WAN

    After a vagabond year, changing location with each production, Phoenix Theatre is celebrating its 75th season in a newly refurbished home. The ample lobby, rest rooms and plush seats make the facility, renovated at a cost of $5 million, an attractive...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 21, 1995
  • Article

    REBEL WITHOUT A PAUSE

    Harold Pinter is arguably the most influential English dramatist in the second half of the 20th century. Traces of Pinter's spare and oblique dialogue can be found in the works of Edward Albee, Tom Stoppard, Arthur Kopit, Sam Shepard, David Mamet and...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 14, 1995
  • Article

    WIDOW'S PIQUE

    "I need a man!" screech female voices in the Planet Earth Multi-Cultural Theatre production of Federico Garcia Lorca's classic tale of Spanish suppression, The House of Bernarda Alba. Since that sentiment suggests a solution rather simplistic for...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 14, 1995
  • Article

    BARD COMPANY

    Grand Canyon University has launched a promising season of Shakespeare with a scintillating production of Tom Stoppard's contemporary classical romp Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. The sensation of the 1967 season on Broadway--it won the New...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 31, 1995
  • Article

    THE WITCHING HOUR

    The Diviners came to my attention by winning the prestigious American College Theatre Festival Award at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. I brought author James Leonard Jr. to New York to participate in the Circle Repertory Company Plays-in-Prog...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 31, 1995
  • Article

    WHISKER'S MOTHERIS A CAT REALLY CAPABLE OF CREATING AN ARTISTIC MOUSERPIECE?

    I fell for it. I believed, after glancing through the book Why Cats Paint, that the authors had really managed to document the unleashing of feline artistic finesse. And, indeed, at first blush, this slim volume, which outsold nearly everything las...

    by Bettie Rinehart on August 24, 1995
  • Article

    THE GAY WHITE WAYCURRENT BROADWAY SEASON DOMINATED BY GUYS SANS DOLLS

    This New York theatre season will be remembered as the year of the penises. The age of the gay play has arrived with a vengeance, and with an unprecedented display of genitalia. With five gay plays currently playing on New York stages, it is clear th...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    MADRE HOUSE ON MCDOWELLPHOENIX ART MUSEUM CELEBRATES CONTRIBUTIONS OF LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN

    I remember one night in college, my classmate Carol and I were cramming for Dr. Deleuze's art history exam, smoking up a storm and bitching about the absence of women in our art history texts. One of the books was H.W. Janson's History of Art. I reme...

    by Bettie Rinehart on August 10, 1995
  • Article

    QUASI-NO-NO

    There have been many versions of Victor Hugo's classic melodrama The Hunchback of Notre Dame, several of them captured on film. Most memorable is the 1923 silent film starring "the man of a thousand faces," the legendary Lon Chaney as Quasimodo. The ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 10, 1995
  • Article

    DEAD BIRDIE

    Last summer, Davis Productions gave us the wonderfully polished, Broadway-quality Pirates of Penzance. This summer's offering, Bye, Bye Birdie, falls far short of last year's benchmark production. From sets that resemble three-year-old high school fl...

    by Gerald Thomson on July 27, 1995
  • Article

    JEWISH WRY

    Probably the best argument that can be made for continuing federal funding for the arts is to consider what kind of entertainment would proliferate if market demands become the sole influence on artistic repertoire. One measure by which we mig...

    by Marshall W. Mason on July 20, 1995
  • Article

    DO LOOK IN THE BASEMENTTUCSON MUSEUM DIRECTOR TREATS THE ARIZONA BIENNIAL AS IF IT'S BENEATH CONTEMPT

    If you want to see the state of contemporary art in Arizona, you'll have to go down to Tucson--and down the stairs at the Tucson Museum of Art. The Arizona Biennial, the only statewide juried exhibition open to all artists and craftspeople from or li...

    by Bettie Rinehart on July 13, 1995
  • Article

    OKIE DOKEY

    On March 31, 55 years ago, the golden age of the American musical was born. It is easy to imagine the shiver the audience must have experienced on that opening night, when the houselights went down and, without an overture, the curtain rose on a farm...

    by Marshall W. Mason on July 6, 1995
  • Article

    MOM-AND-POP ART

    "When you photograph me, I feel everything leave me. The blood drains from my face, my eyelids droop, my thoughts disappear. I can feel my facial muscles go limp. All you have to do is to give me that one cue, 'Don't smile,' and zap. Nothing. That's ...

    by Bettie Rinehart on June 29, 1995
  • Article

    BIBLE BELTER

    Forget Las Vegas! Fly over to Gammage Auditorium instead. You'll lose your frequent-flier miles, but you'll catch the most scintillating flash of flesh the law will allow. I'm speaking, of course, of that simple children's Bible tale, Joseph and the ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on June 29, 1995
  • Article

    LOVE TRY ANGLE

    "The time has come to speak of love," the Narrator solemnly tells us. "The lover and the beloved come from different countries. The curt truth is that in a deep, secret way, the state of being beloved is intolerable to many; for the lover craves any ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on June 29, 1995
  • Article

    BEREAVE IT OR NOT

    A couple of things really pissed me off when I turned 50: It wasn't enough that my junk mail started to include weekly solicitations to join AARP, I had to buy glasses from the drugstore to read them. If that didn't make you smile, you probabl...

    by Marshall W. Mason on June 15, 1995
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Local Galleries Are Suffering from Heat Exhaustion This Summer Local Galleries Are Suffering from Heat Exhaustion This Summer

Misery loves company. I guess that's why people won't stop talking about the fiery furnace that is a Phoenix summer. Arizonans have a complex when it comes to the heat,… More >>

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