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  • Article

    My Left Footlight

    Remember camp? It was that over-the-top ironic sensibility that gained favor in the Sixties, and one assumed that, like Dada, in time it would find its way to the dung heap of history. But here we are 30 years later, and some people still have not lo...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 12, 1995
  • Article

    Slum Enchanted Evening

    "Maria! I just met a girl named Maria/And suddenly that name will never be the same to me." Her real name is Katherine Stewart, and she is the main reason to see the revival of West Side Story, currently stirring up the sleepy suburbs at Mesa Amphith...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 12, 1995
  • Article

    Hither and Yarn

    The Eureka! Theatre Company has shown itself to be a bastion of controlled-risk theatre. Founder and artistic director Evann Wilcosky has consistently produced top-quality productions of plays most theatres in the Valley won't touch. Last season's ro...

    by Gerald Thomson on October 12, 1995
  • Article

    DINNER ROLE

    Between relatively mundane courses, Copper State Dinner Theatre is serving up a delectable comedy called I Hate Hamlet. This amusing morsel had a colorful run on Broadway in 1991 for 80 performances, but is remembered mainly for the disgraceful behav...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 5, 1995
  • Article

    BABY BLOOMER

    Childsplay has begun its 19th season on a triumphant note with a stunningly imaginative production of The Secret Garden. This version of Frances Hodgson Burnett's classic novel is a new adaptation by Pamela Sterling, told in a straightforward narra...

    by Marshall W. Mason on October 5, 1995
  • Article

    A HISTORY OF FAILURE

    Fife Symington's partnership with Chicanos Por La Causa to build the Mercado retail and office center in downtown Phoenix was hailed by community leaders in 1986 as a visionary step that would help rekindle a deserted downtown. Nine years later, th...

    by John Dougherty on October 5, 1995
  • Article

    UP AND ATOM

    Get out your Raybans and suntan lotion because the Valley's art season opens with a nuclear blast this year. Ground Zero is Scottsdale Center for the Arts, currently housing "Critical Mass" and "The P2 Project," two exhibitions which examine the rela...

    by Bettie Rinehart on October 5, 1995
  • Article

    MUSIC LESSONS

    Godspell has been a source of both controversy and inspiration since its first production in 1971. It was written in reaction to a lethargic Anglican church. John-Michael Tebelak, then a drama student at Carnegie Tech's School of Drama, created the m...

    by Gerald Thomson on October 5, 1995
  • Article

    WINGED VICTORY

    The most important theatre event of this decade, Tony Kushner's epic masterpiece Angels in America, has arrived in Phoenix. It is the largest and deepest play since Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? hit Broadway in 1962, and joins A Streetcar Named ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 28, 1995
  • Article

    RED ROCK TEST

    When I first moved to the Valley two years ago, I did the expected thing--I made a visit to Sedona. I was interested in the town for many reasons: the allure of the name, which comes from Sedona Schnebly, who founded the town with husband Carl in 190...

    by Bettie Rinehart on September 21, 1995
  • Article

    AUNTIE ESTABLISHMENT

    Theater Works is turning out its annual miracle: a great, bloated Broadway musical on a tiny stage in a barn. The occasion is its revival of Jerry Herman's Mame, featuring 156 costumes and a sterling star turn. When the literati debate the virtues ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 21, 1995
  • Article

    ACT WAN

    After a vagabond year, changing location with each production, Phoenix Theatre is celebrating its 75th season in a newly refurbished home. The ample lobby, rest rooms and plush seats make the facility, renovated at a cost of $5 million, an attractive...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 21, 1995
  • Article

    REBEL WITHOUT A PAUSE

    Harold Pinter is arguably the most influential English dramatist in the second half of the 20th century. Traces of Pinter's spare and oblique dialogue can be found in the works of Edward Albee, Tom Stoppard, Arthur Kopit, Sam Shepard, David Mamet and...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 14, 1995
  • Article

    WIDOW'S PIQUE

    "I need a man!" screech female voices in the Planet Earth Multi-Cultural Theatre production of Federico Garcia Lorca's classic tale of Spanish suppression, The House of Bernarda Alba. Since that sentiment suggests a solution rather simplistic for...

    by Marshall W. Mason on September 14, 1995
  • Article

    BARD COMPANY

    Grand Canyon University has launched a promising season of Shakespeare with a scintillating production of Tom Stoppard's contemporary classical romp Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. The sensation of the 1967 season on Broadway--it won the New...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 31, 1995
  • Article

    THE WITCHING HOUR

    The Diviners came to my attention by winning the prestigious American College Theatre Festival Award at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. I brought author James Leonard Jr. to New York to participate in the Circle Repertory Company Plays-in-Prog...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 31, 1995
  • Article

    WHISKER'S MOTHERIS A CAT REALLY CAPABLE OF CREATING AN ARTISTIC MOUSERPIECE?

    I fell for it. I believed, after glancing through the book Why Cats Paint, that the authors had really managed to document the unleashing of feline artistic finesse. And, indeed, at first blush, this slim volume, which outsold nearly everything las...

    by Bettie Rinehart on August 24, 1995
  • Article

    THE GAY WHITE WAYCURRENT BROADWAY SEASON DOMINATED BY GUYS SANS DOLLS

    This New York theatre season will be remembered as the year of the penises. The age of the gay play has arrived with a vengeance, and with an unprecedented display of genitalia. With five gay plays currently playing on New York stages, it is clear th...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    MADRE HOUSE ON MCDOWELLPHOENIX ART MUSEUM CELEBRATES CONTRIBUTIONS OF LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN

    I remember one night in college, my classmate Carol and I were cramming for Dr. Deleuze's art history exam, smoking up a storm and bitching about the absence of women in our art history texts. One of the books was H.W. Janson's History of Art. I reme...

    by Bettie Rinehart on August 10, 1995
  • Article

    QUASI-NO-NO

    There have been many versions of Victor Hugo's classic melodrama The Hunchback of Notre Dame, several of them captured on film. Most memorable is the 1923 silent film starring "the man of a thousand faces," the legendary Lon Chaney as Quasimodo. The ...

    by Marshall W. Mason on August 10, 1995
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