Carey Methley carries the anti-Trump flag in London on Friday, July 13.EXPAND
Carey Methley carries the anti-Trump flag in London on Friday, July 13.
Courtesy of Karen Fiorito

How Phoenix Billboard Art Ended Up at London Trump Protest

Perhaps you've spotted a familiar image among all the Trump protest signs in London.

Turns out, the artist who created the anti-Trump billboard on Grand Avenue wanted to be part of the London protests surrounding Trump's travels for the NATO summit.

So she had a London shop make a flag version of her mural, for a Facebook friend who wanted to march with it this week.

Beatrice Moore commissioned Los Angeles-based Karen Fiorito to create this billboard mural after Trump's election.EXPAND
Beatrice Moore commissioned Los Angeles-based Karen Fiorito to create this billboard mural after Trump's election.
Lynn Trimble

Karen Fiorito, a Los Angeles-based artist with ties to Phoenix, created the mural after Trump's election. It was commissioned by artist and preservation advocate Beatrice Moore, who owns the billboard situated over a shop called 11th Monkey.

The 40-foot mural, located on Grand Avenue between 10th and 11th avenues, features Trump's face flanked by dollar signs resembling swastikas and nuclear mushroom-shaped clouds. It went up on March 17 last year.

For the opposite side of the billboard, Fiorito created a series of five hands spelling out the word “unity” in sign language. At first, the background featured rays in the color of Arizona's flag. But she's updated that to include rays of rainbow colors instead.

The London flag features just the Trump portion of the billboard, printed on polyester by a London shop called Bags of Love. The flag is 48 inches long and 14 inches high. It's mounted on a pole that makes it easier to carry and display.

Fiorito ordered the flag after chatting with Facebook friend Carly Methley, who wanted to carry the anti-Trump art during the protest. Methley took photos while protesting and posted them on Facebook, so now Fiorito's mural art is reaching new audiences.

"I'm glad it's there," Fiorito says. "It's important to protest this president wherever he goes in the world."

Fiorito notes that there's a long tradition of fighting dictators by mocking them and using humor.

"We need to let the president know that we don't like his policies and he's not popular."

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >