Best of Phoenix®

Best Of 2002

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Best Of :: Arts & Entertainment

Best Place To Play The Slots (The Other Kind)

What legions of us still have childhood memories of time spent in the game room, sitting cross-legged (back then we called it "Indian style") in front of a loop of plastic track, jockeying tiny magnetic cars to race our siblings for superlative titles -- the winner was "the coolest person on the planet," say, and the loser was "actually adopted but Mom and Dad don't want you to know"?

You can practically hear the whiff of your plaid corduroy trousers just thinking about it.

But now you can relive those easy times at Terry's Performance Raceways, where slot-car racing is way more than a nostalgia trip. It's pretty much a lifestyle. Terry's features (for now) two modes for mini-scale enthusiasts, beginning with the so-called "H.O." racers, those Hot Wheels-style cars that are authentic enough to induce a flashback in almost anyone. And it only costs $6 an hour: $3 for track time, $2 for a car, and $1 for a controller.

Then there's the drag-racing track, where speed is the only thing that matters. Even with cars that are 1/24th scale, Terry himself claims, cars have been clocked on the 55-foot-long track going as fast as 50 miles per hour, real time. He's currently building a 1/32nd-scale road course, but for now the main event is on Friday and Saturday evenings, when diehard slot jockeys compete in earnest. For a $5 entry fee you can compete if you make the qualifiers; and winners can receive up to 30 percent of the pooled money in store credit, which the proprietor says can sometimes be enough to buy you your own new car -- Terry's, you see, also sells a full line of cars, tracks and slot-car accessories.

"Racing cars to win more cars," Terry says. "That's just gotta be the best thing on Earth."

Best Post-9/11 Concert Moment

Following September 11, our nation had collective guilt about trying to enjoy itself. After the postponement of most sporting events and the Emmys that first weekend, ducking out on a Sunday night to see a band seemed a premature and potentially depressing proposition. But the Issaquah, Washington, trio, which began its tour on September 4, hit the right chord with a video presentation that probably was a happy accident more than anything else. Whatever its genesis, it was a stroke of genius to open the show with video footage of crumbling buildings played in reverse. After a week of watching the towers collapse over and over again on television, the idea of seeing something constructive for a change brought more smiles and a more restored semblance of normalcy than even 100 stacks of "Fuck Osama" tee shirts. In its modest way, the Mouse made a difference. This band deserves to be huge.

Best Punk Rock Bar

When word got around that The Blue Ox was going to become a Mexican bar, we mourned the short life span of our favorite dive -- but not for long. Before we could shed a tear for our old haunt, The Rogue -- formerly known as Sneaky Pete's -- got a bit of a makeover and became the new destination for the same punk and rockabilly crowd. Thanks in large part to Blue Ox personality Randy, who brought his schmoozing skills to the new joint to book the same kinds of bands, The Rogue is not only a great place to kick back with a cold one and enjoy a smokin' jukebox or Saturday-night DJs Nate and Allen, but to see cheap, fun trash-rock acts.

Best Club For Blues

This venerable little club doesn't look like much from the outside. No matter. Inside, the beer is always cold and the music is hot. Bob Corritore (a mean harmonica player himself) works tirelessly to keep this national-level blues joint afloat -- and right in our own backyard. For this, we thank the Blues God from the bottom of our aching, mistreated hearts. Corritore books everyone from the surviving Mississippi Delta kings to up-and-coming honkers from right here in the Valley, and at an eminently fair price to consumers. What more could a bluesbo ask for?

Best Club For Rock

What do Agent Orange, the Handsome Family, Poster Children, Daniel Johnston, Death Cab for Cutie, Mike Watt and Frank Black all have in common? No, it's not a track list for a great mix CD; they're all acts that played Nita's Hideaway in 2002. The intimate venue continues to sate the hunger of deprived music fans with its cornucopia of musical goodness.

Nita's constantly provides a great balance of up-and-coming indie acts, under-the-radio-radar artists and high-quality touring acts that would normally skip our metro altogether. This is largely due to the work of local musical seer Charlie Levy, who seamlessly combines music sense, charm and passion. For years, Nita's has boasted such an amazing array of musical diversity that simply listing its acts would be testament enough to Levy's keen ear and vision.

But the Nita's we know and love is in transition. Due to re-zoning, the building on Rio Salado soon will be no more, perhaps to be replaced by another huge outdoor shopping extravaganza. But fear not. Club owner Mark Covert has a new site lined up, and Levy cannot feign retirement for long. He would never admit it, but he loves what he does.

Best Teen Spirit

Teen Central is cool. Too cool for our decidedly unhip vocab. And this is as it should be.

Designed by architect Will Bruder and based on the findings of teen focus groups he conducted, the 5,000-foot, ultramodern space inside Burton Barr is not your mother's library. A brushed metal reference desk is backdropped by towering stereo and computer equipment. Music jams throughout. No one is hushed for chatting, because most chatting is conducted via instant messaging.

The circular space features 20 wired, souped-up machines, free for surfing, music listening or gaming. Other amenities to attract teen people include a "living room" with comfy chairs, surround sound and a big-screen cable TV; an art gallery featuring works by young artists; and a cafe. Teen Central also has mucho multimedia. Its CDs, DVDs, videos, books and games are current titles requested by teens and evaluated by Teen Services librarian Karl Kendall. A cursory glance at the CDs offered titles ranging from Blonde Redhead to La Bohème, as well as a large, heavily trafficked rap/hip-hop section.

The Teen Central space also has hosted live local acts, including indie band Employee of the Moth, Christian MC Vocab Malone, Prism Cru, and high school rock band Drift. Cool.

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Best Place To Play The Slots (The Other Kind): Terry's Performance Raceways

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