Jenny O. is scheduled to perform on Wednesday, September 13, at The Rebel Lounge.
Jenny O. is scheduled to perform on Wednesday, September 13, at The Rebel Lounge.
Melanie Bellomo

The 10 Best Concerts in Phoenix This Week

Music fans of Phoenix, better start saving up some disposable income. We’re about to enter one of the busiest times of year for concerts in the Valley.

As things start to cool down around these parts, the concert scene definitely starts to heat up. And this week will offer something of a taste of things to come.

Over the next four nights, you can attend performances by a mix of famed musicians (Indigo Girls and Beth Hart), old-school rockers (Quicksand), and prominent indie acts (Manchester Orchestra, Jenny O.). There’s also the chance to check out some of the next wave of burgeoning performers, like the ones who will be at the Crescent Ballroom during Brunch Collect’s Beat Social.

Details about all of these shows can be found in the following rundown of the 10 best concerts in Phoenix this week. (And for even more shows happening around Phoenix, hit up our extensive online music listings.)

Hanging out at Maya's Night Swim party.EXPAND
Hanging out at Maya's Night Swim party.
Benjamin Leatherman

Night Swim feat. Quix
Monday, September 11
Maya Day & Nightclub in Scottsdale

Think the pool party season has been dunked in the deep end now that Labor Day is in the rear view? That ain’t necessarily so, pal. As a matter of fact, a few party-friendly swim spots around the Valley will still have fiestas in and around their pools right up until the end of the month. Case in point: Maya Day & Nightclub in Scottsdale has a few more events taking place this month, including its weekly Night Swim events, which offer locals the chance to party and play in the joint’s outdoor pool after dark. The latest edition takes place on Monday, September 11, and will be headlined by New Zealand-born DJ/producer Quix, who specializes in mixes that are heavy on bass sounds and trap music. In other words, don’t put your bathing suit away just yet. Doors open at 10 p.m. Admission is free. Benjamin Leatherman

Blues singer Beth Hart.
Blues singer Beth Hart.
Greg Watermann

Beth Hart
Tuesday, September 12
The Van Buren

Beth Hart has been a star among industry insiders and hardcore blues maniacs for nearly two decades, but the reason she’s filling midsize theaters now can be traced back to the Kennedy Center Honors in 2012, when Jeff Beck asked her to sing Etta James’s “I’d Rather Go Blind” as part of the evening’s Buddy Guy tribute. That was pretty much all it took. Besides the instant bump her lights-out performance on national television gave her – and then-President Barack Obama led the standing ovation – the broadcast’s producer and musical director wound up co-producing Hart’s next album, 2015’s deeply personal (she wrote all the songs herself) mixture of high-powered R&B and more intimate singer-songwriter moments, Better Than Home. Her latest effort, last year’s Fire on the Floor, features tracks that are just as much of a labor of love. Chris Gray

Quicksand rides again.EXPAND
Quicksand rides again.
Courtesy of Epitaph Records

Quicksand
Tuesday, September 12
Crescent Ballroom

When Quicksand played the Mason Jar with Helmet and Hammerhead in 1992-ish (could have been ’93), it was nothing short of amazing. Hammerhead, a three-piece band on Amrep Records, opened the show and blew the doors off the Jar. We thought there was no way Helmet and Quicksand could follow the sheer assault that Hammerhead provided — and both of those heavy-hitting quartets were at the top of their game. Quicksand came on next and absolutely destroyed everyone in attendance. Eardrums and faces were subsequently melted, and the audience ate up every minute of the band’s performance as song after song from the band’s 1993 release, Slip, was played to everyone’s sheer and utter delight. Helmet played a vicious, unyielding set as well, but the night belonged to Quicksand. When the news hit that Quicksand would be back to play Phoenix and that they’d be releasing a new record in November, a certain nostalgia took over and we were transported back to that sweaty, packed show 24 or 25 years ago. Quicksand rides again, and each of the 200 or so people who were at the show in the early 1990s will never forget it. Let’s hope that something unforgettable will happen again. Tom Reardon

Manchester Orchestra is heading back to the Valley.
Manchester Orchestra is heading back to the Valley.
Mike Dempsey

Manchester Orchestra
Tuesday, September 12
Marquee Theatre in Tempe

Barely a month removed from the release of their fifth studio album, Manchester Orchestra will return to the Valley in support of their most ambitious record to date. For A Black Mile to the Surface, vocalist Andy Hull and crew returned to the studio with a more intimate album in mind than its hard-hitting predecessor, 2013’s Cope. Where Cope was, in Hull’s own words, “brutal and pounding you over the head on every track,” A Black Mile finds its strength in its harmonies and lyricism, which explore marriage, fatherhood and all things familial. But becoming a husband and dad hasn’t robbed Hull of his metaphorical leanings, and A Black Mile is brimming with symbolism and imagery, stemming mostly from the real-life mining town of Lead, South Dakota. They say being a parent changes you, and it seems to have changed Andy Hull for the better. His latest record shows the 30-year-old maturing to his best self so far — both sonically and vocally. And he’ll be the first to tell you the best is yet to come. Matthew Keever

The members of Eidola.
The members of Eidola.
Courtesy of the artist

Eidola
Tuesday, September 12
The Rebel Lounge

Fans of experimental rock or progressive metal oughta give Eidola a listen. Ditto for anyone who digs post-hardcore that’s very much in the vein of Circa Survive, Thrice, and Dance Gavin Dance. The five members of this Utah-born band, which fits into the self-described genre of “existential experimentation,” specialize in all of those types of sounds, which are topped with the angst-ridden lyrics of lead singer Andrew Michael Wells. Eidola’s touring in support of it’s lastest album To Speak, To Listen (which dropped earlier this year and has accumulated a collection of positive reviews) and will hit The Rebel Lounge on Tuesday, September 12. The Ongoing Concept, Save Us From the Archon, Amor, Paranova, Archetypes Collide, and Adero will open. Doors are at 6:30 p.m. and tickets are $12-$14. Benjamin Leatherman

Read on for more "can't miss" concerts in Phoenix this week, including The Magpie Salute, Indigo Girls, and Greensky Bluegrass.

Bluegrass/rock band Greensky Bluegrass.EXPAND
Bluegrass/rock band Greensky Bluegrass.
Dylan Langille

Greensky Bluegrass
Wednesday, September 13
The Van Buren

Greensky Bluegrass was formed in 2000 when Michael Bont, Dave Bruzza, and Paul Hoffman decided to learn to play the mandolin, banjo, and acoustic guitar together. "The band started out as people having fun playing music. All these years later, we're still having fun playing music," says member Anders Beck. "[My bandmates] got into bluegrass backdoor. They liked the Grateful Dead, and then they learned Jerry Garcia played bluegrass. All of a sudden that gets you into Bill Monroe, and the next thing you know, the only thing you're listening to is Ralph Stanley." Beck joined the band a few years into its formation, adding his expertise with the dobro, a wood-bodied resonator guitar that he stumbled upon at a workshop at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. "I'd heard the instrument on lots of songs but didn't realize ... that was the sound I wanted to play. The dobro is the electric guitar of acoustic music. It has a little bit of horsepower." Though Greensky Bluegrass play an old-timey brand of music, the band found a way to attract modern listeners. "Cover songs are a way for us to connect with the audience. You can lure in an audience when there's common ground. You like Prince or Michael Jackson? So do we. Then those new fans will listen to your original music." David Rolland

Singer-songwriter Jenny O.EXPAND
Singer-songwriter Jenny O.
Courtesy of the APA Agency

Jenny O.
Wednesday, September 13
The Rebel Lounge

Jenny O. is the kind of artist who both mystifies and makes you want to be her best friend. Her style is charmingly raw, her vocals somewhat timid; a gentle shakiness lies beneath her arresting rasp, which sounds as if it’s been marinated in decades of pain and wisdom, although the singer-songwriter hasn’t hit her mid-30s. Her apparent shyness is understandable — though she’s toured with Father John Misty and Sixto Rodriguez, having only an acoustic guitar and a microphone to stand between you and an intensely quiet room full of people is enough to make anyone feel exposed. But that silence is because her audience tends to hang on her every word — poignant, personal, sometimes humorous but always guileless, which is what you can hear on her latest album, Peace & Information, recorded by prominent folk-rock artist and producer Jonathan Wilson. This week, she’ll be at The Rebel Lounge along with indie pop songstress Tristen. Artemis Thomas-Hansard

Local artist WOLFZiE.
Local artist WOLFZiE.
Courtesy of the artist

Brunch Collect's Beat Social
Wednesday, September 13
Crescent Ballroom

The M.O. of Brunch Collect is quite laudable. According to its Facebook page, the Arizona-based music collective and its members just want to get exposure for their efforts. “We are musicians who know the struggle of creating without having an outlet or having the right connections to be heard,” the page states. “We want to give under-appreciated artists a place to be heard.” And they’ve been doing just that at recent events like last week’s “Show Me What You’ve Got” showcase at The Rebel Lounge, which featured a number of up-and-coming beat-makers and DJs from the local scene. This week’s “Beat Social” at the Crescent is along the same lines and will offer sessions by such artists and performers as WOLFZiE, Dirte Jeans, Korey Wade, Pseudocentric, Illathnmst, $kvnkdvddy, and 5lvls. The music starts at 8 p.m. and admission is free. Benjamin Leatherman

The Magpie Salute (from left): Katrine Ottosen, Joe Magistro, Charity White, Nico Bereciartua, Rich Robinson, John Hogg, Marc Ford, Sven Pipien, Adrien Reju, and Matt Slocum
The Magpie Salute (from left): Katrine Ottosen, Joe Magistro, Charity White, Nico Bereciartua, Rich Robinson, John Hogg, Marc Ford, Sven Pipien, Adrien Reju, and Matt Slocum
Courtesy of MSOPR

The Magpie Salute
Thursday, September 14
Marquee Theatre in Tempe

Singer/guitarist Rich Robinson knows what people might think about his new band, The Magpie Salute: that they are some kind of Black Crowes tribute that happens to play a lot of their songs with a lineup that includes himself (a Crowes co-founder with brother Chris), and former BC members Marc Ford and Sven Pipien. They would be wrong. “I wanted to find a way to honor our past, but also honor what we’re doing now and the relationships we have, and take it forward. This band is a loosely based cousin of the Black Crowes,” Robinson says. While BC has had its share of breakups, reunions, and hiatuses over the years, the 2014 rift and subsequent public back-and-forth between the Brothers Robinson over money, artistic and naming issues seems to be a bit more permanent. On a whim, Rich reached out to Ford, as well as fellow ex-Crowe Eddie Harsch, to join him for a gig last year at at Applehead Studios in Woodstock, New York. Over three days of rehearsal, the supersized unit ran through a set of Crowes music, classic-rock covers, solo material, and more. The show was received rapturously by the audience. And as Robinson continued his solo band tour, it laid the groundwork for The Magpie Salute. Sadly, though, Harsch died unexpectedly in November at the age of 59.

Earlier this year, The Magpie Salute released its self-titled debut, which includes the last recorded work of Harsch, whose death just before the New York shows came as a blow to Robinson and the fledgling group, he admits. The 10 tracks on the album include only one original song, leadoff single “Omission.” The rest are covers by the Crowes (“Wiser Time”), Delaney and Bonnie (“Comin’ Home”), The Faces (“Glad and Sorry”), Pink Floyd (“Fearless”), and the Band (“Ain’t No More Cane”). There’s also a super-deep cut – the socially conscious/political “War Drums,” from the first Eric Burdon-less release by War from 1971. Bob Ruggiero

Emily Saliers and Amy Ray of Indigo Girls.EXPAND
Emily Saliers and Amy Ray of Indigo Girls.
Courtesy of High Road Touring

Indigo Girls
Thursday, September 14
The Van Buren

Before the honey-sweet vocal harmonies of indie-folk darlings Tegan and Sara, there were the Indigo Girls. Their brand of heartfelt folk rock had commercial appeal from the beginning, leading to a quarter-century-long career for the singer/songwriters, who continue to write and tour today. But as two openly gay best friends making music together, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers have always gone against the grain. Ignoring advice to keep their sexuality under wraps to avoid being pigeonholed in the industry, the two decided to let the music speak for itself and have used their public platform to speak out on issues that matter to them: feminism, human rights, and the environment. They're not just the Indigo Girls; they're also entrepreneurs, activists, and generally great human beings. Falyn Freyman

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