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Arizona Ballot Propositions: How to Vote Against (or With) Russell Pearce and His Ilk

Here's the thing about the propositions on the ballot for tomorrow's election: for the most part, they're boring, and at the end of the day, you may not really give a damn.

Thankfully, people like ousted state Senate President Russell Pearce, Governor Jan Brewer, and the lobbyists from Center for Arizona Policy have given their opinions on many of the propositions, which might make it easier for you to make a choice either way.

We'll have our more detailed explanations of the propositions later, but below, we'll list the propositions on the ballot, along with how your favorites feel about them.

  • Proposition 114
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of protecting crime victims from having to pay damages to a person who was injured while that person committed or attempted to commit a felony against the victim.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to liability for damages.

Russell Pearce says "yes" to 114, and says he's the author.


  • Proposition 115
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of (1) increasing the terms of Arizona Supreme Court justices, Appellate and Superior Court judges to eight years; (2) raising the retirement age for justices and judges from seventy to seventy-five; (3) changing membership of commissions on appellate and trial court appointments and procedures for appointing justices and judges; (4) requiring the Supreme, Appellate, and Superior courts to publish decisions online, (5) requiring the Supreme Court to send a copy of the judicial performance review of each justice and judge who is up for retention to the Legislature, and (6) allowing a joint legislative committee to meet and take testimony on justices and judges up for retention.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to the courts.


Russell Pearce says "yes" to 115, and says he's the author of this one, too. The Center for Arizona Policy says "yes" to this one too, as does Governor Jan Brewer.


  • Proposition 116
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of setting the amount exempt from annual taxes on business equipment and machinery purchased after 2012 to an amount equal to the combined earnings of 50 Arizona workers.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to annual taxes on business equipment and machinery.

Russell Pearce says "yes" to 116, and only takes partial credit for making this one. Tom Jenney, director of Arizona's chapter of American's for Prosperty -- of Koch Industries fame -- also says "yes." (Caveat: Democratic state Representative Chad Campbell says "yes" too.)


 

  • Proposition 117
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of setting a limit on the annual percentage increase in property values used to determine property taxes to no more than 5% above the previous year, and establishes a single limited property value as the basis for determining all property taxes on real property, beginning in 2014.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to calculating property values and taxes.

Russell Pearce says "no" to 117, which is confusing, because his bro Lester and state Senator Sylvia Allen -- New Times' "Best Loon" -- say "yes." Either way, your credibility as a sane person is screwed.


  • Proposition 118
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of changing the distribution formula for the State Land Trust Permanent Endowment Fund, which funds various public institutions, including schools, to be 2.5% of the average monthly market values of the Fund for the immediately preceding five calendar years. The change would affect fiscal years 2013 through 2021.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to the distribution formula of the State Land Trust Permanent Endowment Fund.

Russell Pearce says "yes" here, as does state Treasurer Doug Ducey, Governor Brewer, schools Superintendent John Huppenthal, and Tom Jenney again.


  • Proposition 119
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of authorizing the exchange of state trust lands if the exchange is related to either protecting military facilities or improving the management of state trust lands and prescribes the process for such exchanges. This process includes two independent appraisals and analyses, public hearings, and approval by public vote.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to state trust lands.

Russell Pearce is "undecided" on this bad boy, although he says it "concerns" him. State Representative Debbie Lesko, perhaps best known for fighting birth control , says "yes."


 

  • Proposition 120
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of repealing Arizona's disclaimer of all right and title to federal public lands within the state and declaring Arizona's sovereignty over public lands and all natural resources within its boundaries. This excludes Indian reservations, lands of the United States, and lands over which jurisdiction has been ceded by the state of Arizona.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping current constitutional law related to public lands and natural resources within Arizona's boundaries.

Russell Pearce says "yes." Sylvia Allen says "yes" as well.


  • Proposition 121
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of replacing the current party primary election with a "top-two" primary election in which all voters, regardless of party affiliation, vote in a single, combined primary, and the top two vote-getters for each seat advance to the general election ballot. This "top-two" primary will not apply to the election of the U.S. President or to elections in which no party affiliation appears on the ballot.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of keeping the current party primary election in which each recognized political party selects a candidate to appear on the general election ballot.

Russell Pearce says "no," because it's "intended to eliminate Conservatives from the General Elections." Other "no" opinions include Maricopa County Republican Committee chairman Robert Haney, Governor Brewer, Debbie Lesko, Senate Majority Leader Andy Biggs, Senate President Steve Pierce, Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery, Arizona Republican Party chairman Tom Morrissey, Center for Arizona Policy President Cathi Herrod and her organization, Sylvia Allen, and House Speaker Andy Tobin.


  • Proposition 204
A "yes" vote shall have the effect of permanently increasing the state sales tax by one cent per dollar, effective June 1, 2013, for the purpose of funding educational programs, public transportation infrastructure projects, and human services. It forbids reductions to current K-12 and university funding levels and forbids reductions to the current state sales tax base.

A "no" vote shall have the effect of not increasing the state sales tax by one cent per one dollar, beginning June 1, 2013.

Russell Pearce says "no." Other "no" opinions include Governor Brewer, Debbie Lesko, and the Center for Arizona Policy.


  • Judge Retention

Russell Pearce recommends that you vote "no" on the retention of every single judge on the ballot because he's trying to " protest the process of not actually election our judges ." So, if Pearce gets his way, maybe everyone can "actually election our judges."


"actually election our judges."

"actually election our judges."

"actually election our judges."

"actually election our judges."

"actually election our judges."




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