Baby Gabriel Mom's MCSO Inmate Assault: The Details and More on Sheriff Joe's "Loaf"

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office announced yesterday that Elizabeth Johnson, the mother of missing baby Gabriel Johnson, had been moved from the jail's general population to the its loony bin after assaulting two other inmates and then refusing to eat some of Joe's "loaf."

Despite Sheriff Joe Arpaio's public touting of Johnson as the model inmate, Johnson assaulted the two inmates by spraying cleaning products in their eyes and was placed in Joe's controversial loa program.

As you read yesterday, the loaf program, according to the Sheriff's Office, was created about 10 years ago to "prevent inmates from assaulting detention officers and other inmates."

Loaf, according to the MCSO, is nonfat, dry milk powder, an assortment of fruits and vegetables, chili powder, and bread dough compacted into one solid brick-like thing, which Arpaio forces inmates to eat when they misbehave.

According to Arpaio's office, after she was placed in the loa" program, Johnson gave a detention officer a document she called "My Advanced Directive's Will," in which she said she was starving by refusing to eat Joe's loaf because it was full of rotten vegetables and worms.

After refusing to eat the loaf, Johnson was tossed in the nut house for "evaluation."

From the sheriff's description of his loaf, Johnson's refusal to eat it sounds perfectly sane to us -- and the sheriff seems to agree.

After refusing an interview with New Times, Arpaio spoke to KPHO, telling the station that while his loaf isn't very appealing, it's nutritious and edible.

Then America's self-proclaimed "toughest sheriff" says he probably wouldn't eat it.

"I don't see any worms in there, but it's hard to tell, you know. Quite frankly, I don't know that I'd eat this," Arpaio tells KPHO.

But Elizabeth Johnson's refusal to eat the crap is grounds for a psychiatric evaluation?

Sorry, Joe -- we won't argue that Johnson doesn't belong in the loony bin, but...


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