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Jerry's Pen Is Active
In its October 3 edition, the Arizona Republic dropped all pretense of objectivity on Jerry Colangelo and had Big Jer (or his spin docs) actually write a column about how wonderful downtown Phoenix has become now that he is set to get gloriously rich there, thanks to taxpayer-financed sports venues.

Jerry the writer notes that America West Arena is the product of "a unique public-private partnership" that serves as a "'win-win' relationship." The Flash has observed that whenever the phrase "win-win" is invoked, someone is getting screwed and someone else is winning twice. We think we know how this is stacking up.

Bank One Ballpark, Colangelo the scribe opines, is "another outstanding public-private partnership." Except voters in Maricopa County weren't given a choice on joining the partnership, as were voters in other cities with new stadiums. Of course, those cities--Cleveland; Denver; Baltimore; Arlington, Texas--have democratic forms of government.

Perhaps suspecting that "smog detour" signs and gubernatorial admonitions against driving at night might not completely resolve the Valley's air-pollution quandary, the magnate turned columnist asserts that it's "time for city leadership to accelerate its push for a public transportation system through the central city and beyond."

Phoenix should heed this sage advice--and finance the new "light-rail" system Colangelo demands with a hefty surcharge on all tickets sold at Phoenix Suns and Arizona Diamondbanks games.

The Monkey Wench Gang
When it comes to environmental activism, Robin Silver is without peer in Arizona. Silver, an emergency-room physician, has often gone to court to force government agencies to comply with environmental laws and regulations. His tenacity has earned him no friends in extractive industries and few friends within his own political party, the GOP.

Last month, Silver made a quixotic primary election bid in the 4th Congressional District and was predictably trounced by the incumbent, John Shadegg, a Newt Gingrich clone and now GOPAC's chief string-puller.

One or several of Silver's legion of detractors sent The Flash the accompanying photo, which contains a doctored campaign sign. (Silver's original signs said "He's Right," which in The Flash's estimation made them immediately collectible.) The correspondence also poses a couple of thorny questions: "How many trees were cut down to make the wood stakes for his sign?" and "Why do his campaign signs continue to litter the urban landscape many weeks after his defeat in the primary?"

The item came from a group calling itself the "Federation of Lawless Axe-Wielding Environment Desecrators (FLAWED)."

This subversive organization's bastard sign might not be clever--or even remotely amusing--but The Flash must commend it as a swell example of recycling.

Feed The Flash: voice, 229-8486; fax, 340-8806; online, flash@newtimes.com


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