Herman Cain Favored by Tea Partiers For Presidential Run. Take That, NAACP

The Tea Partiers were in Phoenix over the weekend for the group's first ever "American Policy Summit," and according to a straw poll conducted during the conference, Georgia businessman Herman Cain, a black guy, is favored to be the allegedly racist Party's candidate for president in the 2012 election.

Cain, 65, who is a former CEO of Godfather's Pizza and board member of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, beat out some of the more infamous names often associated with the Tea Party, including former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, Texas Congressman Ron Paul, and Minnesota Senator Michelle Bachman. However, in an online, probably much-less accurate poll, Paul stole the show with nearly half of those polled supporting his candidacy.

According to the poll taken of those who actually showed up at the conference, 22 percent of those polled favored Cain. Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty was the silver medalist, with 15.87 percent, and Paul came in at the third spot, with 15.04 percent.

Interestingly, President Barack Obama has the support of 0.17 percent of Tea Partiers polled at the convention, while Palin -- the darling of the Conservative movement -- drew about 10 percent.

Cain, as you can see in the above photo, happens to be a black guy. The Tea party, as you may know, has been called a racist organization by many of its left-wing opponents.

In July of 2010, the NAACP passed a resolution condemning the Tea Party for being a racist organization that's trying "to push our country back to the pre-civil rights era."

Supporting a black guy to be the Party's potential nominee for president doesn't exactly support the NAACP's claim. Sure, Tea Partiers could be racists who collectively decided to try and repair the group's image by supporting a black guy for president...we just don't think they're smart enough to concoct such a (ahem) complex plan.

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