Photo Enforcement: Using GPS to Find Speed Cameras Like Needing a Proverbial Flashlight to Find Your...

A commenter on our recent post about process servers who fib plugged a computerized speed-camera-finding unit called GPS Angel, claiming it "knows where all the speed cameras and red light cameras are..."

We assume "Todd Gerson" works for GPS Angel or its PR firm, since he left the same basic comment on several national Web site articles about photo enforcement. A bit of extra Googling found a recent review of the product -- and no surprises.

As one would assume, the GPS Angel apparently did not live up to expecations during a test run in the Phoenix metro area:

During my 200 mile drive with the GPS Angel I logged the following:

Proper alerts to fixed camera locations: 10
Alerts to fixed camera locations no longer active: 6
No alerts at active fixed camera locations: 4
False alerts, no cameras within one mile: 3

The unit costs $99, as the screen shot from the company's Web site shows. But as with all anti-photo-enforcement products that we know of, the purchase does not include a promise to pay your tickets. Since the Arizona Department of Public Safety and several local municipalities use vehicle-mounted speed cameras, it's clear GPS Angel offers at least one guaranteee: The product will never know exactly where all the speed cameras are, all of the time.

Click here to see DPS' list of 36 fixed camera locations; the Web page also says the system now uses 42 mobile cameras.

This one of those products that was obsolete before it was invented. If anyone out thinks spending money on a special GPS device to find speed cameras is a good idea, may we direct you to an amazing contraption that does the same thing -- and it's already provided to you at no charge.

It's called a "sign." DPS and most, of not all, cities place warning signs about 100 yards in front of the cash machine.

Sure, that's not enough warning for some -- especially people who are really hauling ass. And we realize it's confusing and stressful when you see the photo enforcement warning sign but aren't sure if the posted speed limit is 55 or 65 mph.

It's just hard to imagine that speeders who tend to miss warning signs will benefit from a beeping black box on the dashboard that's only right some of the time.

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