Top Five Most-Read Phoenix News Stories of the Week

In case you missed any news action this week, we've got you covered.

Here's our recap of the most-read news stories of the week:

5.) Bill Montgomery's Office Hires "Islamaphobe" to Instruct County Prosecutors on Muslim "Threat"

Top Five Most-Read Phoenix News Stories of the Week

 

The Maricopa County Attorney's Office is sponsoring a training session for its prosecutors and other law enforcement officials on Muslim extremism, taught by individuals described as having an anti-Muslim agenda by various civil rights organizations.

The all-day event, scheduled for September 19 at a hotel in Tempe, is titled "Understanding the Threat," according to a flier advertising the training. It promises the seminar will "cover threats posed to our local communities by Hamas, Hezbollah and Shariah Law."

See also: Bill Montgomery's Office Hires "Islamaphobe" to Instruct County Prosecutors on Muslim "Threat"

  4.) Flooding From Record Rain in Phoenix Area Means Fun for Some, Problems for Others

Ashley Hall and Lauren Ramsay were among the Mesa High School students turning Monday's flood into a water-recreation opportunity.
Ashley Hall and Lauren Ramsay were among the Mesa High School students turning Monday's flood into a water-recreation opportunity.
Images: Ray Stern

 

Monday's record rainfall in the Phoenix area spurred officials to warn parents against letting their kids play in standing water.

But with many schools closed across the Valley 'cause of the historic deluge, what else is there to do?

At Harmony Park in Mesa near Val Vista Drive and the U.S 60 freeway, which experienced some of the Valley's worst flooding, a group of happy Mesa High School students exchanged textbooks for rowboats and spent the morning splashing around.

See also: Flooding From Record Rain in Phoenix Area Means Fun for Some, Problems for Others

  3.) Weeded Out: How the U of A Fired Pot Researcher Sue Sisley After a State Senator Complained

Top Five Most-Read Phoenix News Stories of the Week

 

Sue Sisley, M.D., is nearly blind.

She can't see out of her left eye and has minimal vision in her right, resulting from amblyopia, a condition she's had since birth. Her remaining eyesight "doesn't seem to be deteriorating further," she says. But in recent months, Sisley's been trying to train Penny, a rescue dog from the Humane Society, for her potentially to use someday. It's not really working out. Cute but undisciplined, Penny -- wearing a blue vest -- greets a visitor excitedly at the Arizona Telemedicine Program's Phoenix office.

On this Tuesday afternoon, 45-year-old Sisley is the only person working in the facility. She's got back-to-back video meetings with patients but takes a break to meet with a reporter, after a weeks-long stampede of attention from the news media.

See also: Weeded Out: How the U of A Fired Pot Researcher Sue Sisley After a State Senator Complained

  2.) Storm Around Phoenix Causing Power Outages, Traffic Nightmares

Cars stuck in flooding on Interstate 10 around 43rd Avenue.
Cars stuck in flooding on Interstate 10 around 43rd Avenue.
ADOT

 

Welcome to Phoenix, where a few inches of rain have pretty much turned the city into Atlantis.

Rainfall records are on pace to be broken, schools have canceled classes, power outages are being reported, and cars are floating in the middle of the interstate.

See also: Storm Around Phoenix Causing Power Outages, Traffic Nightmares

  1.) 10 Imaginary Things Arizonans Believe in

 

Arizona is a hotbed for urban legends.

From the state's own Bigfoot, to blood-sucking monsters, to a lady who snatches up kids, and more, we bring you 10 imaginary things that Arizonans believe in:

See also: 10 Imaginary Things Arizonans Believe in

Send feedback and tips to the author. Follow Matthew Hendley on Twitter at @MatthewHendley.


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