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Elote: Mexican Grilled Corn from Tortas Paquime

Ears of corn, ready to become elote with a dip in some mayo, a splash of lime, and a sprinkle of cheese 'n' chile..
Ears of corn, ready to become elote with a dip in some mayo, a splash of lime, and a sprinkle of cheese 'n' chile..
Flickr- Luis Peraza

Tacos may very well be the perfect food, but let's face it, the standard Meximerican fare can get a bit stale after a while. Taco the Town is here to highlight some of the more unusual Mexican finds in the valley.

This week: Elote served up by Tacos Paquime.

¿Como se dice?: Elote refers to grilled corn-on-the-cob, Mexican-style. So if you're strolling through the street of old Mexico, or South Phoenix for that matter, saddle up to a food truck and snag yourself a couple street tacos, an ear of elote, and a bottle of cane sugar Coca-Cola.

Or if the blazing summer heat has you scared, Tortas Paquime can also satisfy your need for this awesome street food trifecta in the comfort of central air. You won't regret trying it, even if you will be picking corn kernels out of your teeth for the next hour.

(sink your teeth into all the spicy details after the jump)

Elote on the go-- the perfect street food in Mexico.
Elote on the go-- the perfect street food in Mexico.
Flickr- vonKinder

La Comida: We spotted elote on the menu at Tortas Paquime and had to try their take on one of our favorite Mexican treats. Unlike some places that gussy up an entire ear of roasted corn and hand it to you to gnaw on like a wild animal, Tortas Paquime keeps it classy and mess free by cutting the kernels off the ear and dressing them in chile-lime goodness.

El Sabor: The lime-infused mayonnaise melts into a hot ear of corn, coating each kernel with a hint of citrus and serving as an excellent buttery substitute. The layer of mayo also acts as glue for a thin layer of dry, crumbly cojita cheese. Sprinkle with chile powder and spritz with another fresh wedge of lime, and you have one helluva ear of corn.

Elote manages to be sweet, savory, spicy, rich, and tart all at once. It's the type of treat that tries to give every one of your tastebuds something to look forward to, and once you've tried this concoction, you won't look at boring old corn the same again.

Bring a bit of México to your kitchen: The best elote starts with an ear of sweet corn, plan your prime elote eating season around harvest time, whenever that is. (Follow our feature In Season to keep up-to-date on all your favorite veg.) Then roast that ear of corn to caramelize some of those tasty sugars, there is a reason corn syrup is so sweet, and whip up some killer elote at home.

Know of any Mexican gems in the Valley? Reveal your family secrets in the comment section.

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