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Magical Prehistory Tour

Recent studies show that cave paintings took up to 20,000 years to complete, with later generations adding to the original pictures. Iconic ’80s pop artist and AIDS activist Keith Haring took his cue from prehistoric man, making chalk “cave paintings” of crawling babies on blank New York subway ad signs...

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Recent studies show that cave paintings took up to 20,000 years to complete, with later generations adding to the original pictures. Iconic ’80s pop artist and AIDS activist Keith Haring took his cue from prehistoric man, making chalk “cave paintings” of crawling babies on blank New York subway ad signs and painting murals on public walls. “Drawing is still basically the same as it has been since prehistoric times,” Haring said. “It brings together man and the world. It lives through magic.”

Catch the first local exhibition of the late artist’s whimsical sculptures and cartoon-like drawings since 1991 during the opening reception for the “Keith Haring (1958-1990)” exhibit. Will generations of graffiti artists add to Haring’s murals, as in ancient times? Not likely. Some of his public paintings, like those at Belgium’s Museum of Contemporary Art, are well-protected, while others -- like the one in Phoenix, natch -- were demolished by greedy developers. Bastards!


Tuesdays-Saturdays. Starts: Feb. 3. Continues through March 3, 2009
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