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The Amazing Racer

It’s mid-January, which means that about 35 percent of Americans have already broken their New Year’s resolutions. Maybe you’re still doing crunches and avoiding carbs, but if you’re like us, you’re already tucked into a giant meatball hoagie watching the latest episode of The Mentalist. Luckily, we can keep our...

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It’s mid-January, which means that about 35 percent of Americans have already broken their New Year’s resolutions. Maybe you’re still doing crunches and avoiding carbs, but if you’re like us, you’re already tucked into a giant meatball hoagie watching the latest episode of The Mentalist.

Luckily, we can keep our resolutions vicariously through artist Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba, who plans to run the circumference of the Earth – nearly 13,000 miles – as part of an ongoing project simulating the experience of refugees. Nguyen-Hatsushiba has documented his process in the “Breathing Is Free 12,756.3: New Work by Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba” exhibit, which opens Saturday, January 24, at ASU Art Museum at Nelson Fine Arts Center, 51 East 10th Street in Tempe. The artist sketches his routes onto satellite photo maps, then uses GPS navigation to help him through each leg of the international run while being filmed and photographed. “Drawing breath becomes more difficult as one’s entire body begins to wear out,” Nguyen-Hatsushiba says in his exhibition booklet. “It’s a real struggle, not a performance.”


Tuesdays-Saturdays. Starts: Jan. 24. Continues through April 26, 2009
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