El Nopalito
Grilled cheese sandwiches were generally reserved for greasy-spoon diners and kids' menus. Then we discovered pambazos, a Mexican take on the tired grilled cheese sandwich. At El Nopalito, order a pambazo and be treated to a huge, soft bun that is similar to the telera used for tortas. This bun is then dipped in a guajillo chile sauce that adds spice and a bright red color. Afterward, your electric-red pambazo is filled with salty queso fresco and grilled. (You can request that meat be added if you absolutely gotta have it.) Top your pambazo with some crisp, cool lettuce and salsa of choice, and you have a grilled cheese sandwich that is anything but boring.
Comedor Guadalajara
Meagan Simmons
Leave the tortilla soup behind. When we're craving Mexican soup (caldos), we look to Comedor Guadalajara to spice up the routine. And we mean literally, as some of their soups are muy picante. During lunch, you'll be treated to a complimentary bowl of soup with your combo, but it's the grande-size serving of caldo de albondigas that keeps us coming back. Perfectly spiced Mexican meatballs float in a flavorful broth packed with veggies. Or try one of their many seafood soups, like the Caldo de Mariscos 7 Mares, a "seven seas" soup loaded with fish, shrimp, lobster, octopus, squid, clams, and mussels. You don't need to wait for a cold day to slurp away.
Los Sombreros
Courtesy of Los Sombreros
If we came across blackened, bloated corncobs infected by huitlacoche in the wild, it's doubtful our first instinct would be to put them in our mouth. But to whoever first mustered up the cojones to pop a couple of these nightmarish kernels, we salute you. Los Sombreros follows in these brave footsteps by celebrating the earthy, mushroom-like flavor of these "Mexican truffles." Thin crêpes are filled with sautéed "corn smut," veggies, and queso, then drizzled in crema and pomegranate sauce. The delicate and exotic flavors meld together to create one heck of an appetizer. Try it once and you'll see why it earns its other moniker, "Mexican caviar."
Gallo Blanco Cafe
Robrt Pela
Elote translates to Mexican-style grilled corn on the cob, and it's where Gallo Blanco really delivers. Maybe not to your house, but definitely to your house. Gallo Blanco gussies an entire ear of sweet roasted corn with lime-infused mayonnaise that coats every kernel with a hint of citrus. The layer of mayo also acts as glue for a thin layer of dry, crumbly cotija cheese. A sprinkle of chili powder and a spritz of fresh lime finish off the perfect elote. Sweet, savory, spicy, rich, and tart all at once, Gallo Blanco's elote is something you won't regret trying, even if you will be picking corn kernels out of your teeth for the next hour.
Salvadoreño Restaurant #3
You live in Arizona and, therefore, are familiar with the standard corn tortilla. What may not be as familiar are pupusas, the Salvadoran take on the masa disks — they remind us of corn tortillas on steroids. At Salvadoreño, they offer up some of the meanest pupusas this side of the border, pumped to the max with ooey, gooey meat and veggie fillings. Our favorite pupusas are the revueltas, packed with pork, cheese, and beans, or the locoro and cheese, made with a South American flower bud similar in taste to asparagus or broccoli. Add a bit of mild red salsa and curtido, a vinegary cabbage slaw, to your pupusa and inhale. Then head to the register for another couple of pupusas. It's the right thing to do.
El Tlacoyo
Heather Hoch
Nopales (or nopalitos) are odd vegetables that you can't find at just any Mexican restaurant, but keep an eye out for something translated as "cactus" on a menu and you're in for a treat. Nopales are the processed, green pad of the prickly pear cactus. Instead of incurring multiple pricks trying to make DIY nopales, we recommend hitting up El Tlacoyo to try the huaraches con nopales. Huaraches hail from Mexico City, and El Tlacoyo does 'em right. Order one of these, and you'll be treated to a huge disk of masa fried to a doughy crisp, topped with nopalitos, beans, salsa verde, and queso. There's even a bit of lettuce for presentation's sake.
Asi Es La Vida
While Oaxaca claims to be the land of seven different moles, here in the Valley, we're pretty much stuck with one: black mole. Mexican chocolate, lots of chiles, sesame, and tomatillo are blended together to create a complex sauce that's savory and just slightly sweet. But with well over 20 ingredients and a laborious daylong prep, it's a complicated sauce to make and difficult to master. When the craving hits us, we just head to Asi Es La Vida. That way we don't have to slave over a stove all day to enjoy a delicious platter of enmoladas or mole chicken, smothered in a rich and tangy chocolate-based sauce that leaves us practically licking our plates.
La Tolteca
Jackie Mercandetti
To call La Tolteca the best panadería (a.k.a. Mexican bakery) is just the tip of the iceberg when describing this Phoenix establishment. The dulce de leche churros (sugary cinnamon sticks filled with sweet caramel filling) are just one of the reasons we keep coming back to this sweet little bite of Mexican goodness. Handmade tortillas, cakes, cookies, and other sweet treats fill the bakery cases, which seem to go on for miles. Along with the baked goods, La Tolteca also offers fresh meat and produce, handmade cheeses and tamales, and some of the best fast Mexican grub in town. It's a great place to grab a quick lunch and, no joke, the burritos are as big as a grown man's arm. The fresh salsa bar alone is worth stopping in for. Come for the churros, but make sure to try at least one of everything else.
Oasis Raspados
Raspados are the Mexican version of the rainbow snow cones that have become a little slice of Americana. But instead of being bland, rock-hard sugar bombs, raspados are packed with chunks of fresh fruit. Tempted? Look no further than Oasis Raspados for a super-fruity concoction in such familiar flavors as strawberry, mango, or watermelon. After you've tried the basic fruit flavors, expand to tamarind, horchata, or walnut. Add some sweetened condensed milk or a scoop of ice cream for a bit more decadence. And if you've got the cojones, try a chamoyada (shaved ice drenched in pickled chile fruit sauce). It's a spicy, tangy twist on an otherwise super-sweet treat.
Realeza Michoacana
Sick of the rock-hard snow cones and corn syrup popsicles from your local ice cream man? Pack up the kids and take them to Realeza Michoacana instead, where they'll get a fresh fruity treat instead of an over-processed, syrupy sugar high. Paletas contain loads of fresh fruit in exotic flavor combos that your local ice cream truck probably doesn't bother stocking. They have familiar fruit flavors and more exotic tropical tastes, like guava, tamarind, and horchata. There's also a "cocktail" paleta if you're feeling the need for a midday frozen margarita, or snag a mango chili paleta with chunks of fresh mango mixed into a salty, lime-infused, chilly treat.

Best Of Phoenix®

Best Of