Border

14-Year-Old Boy Busted Trying to Bring Six Pounds of Meth Over Border in Cans of Corn

Today in Found at the Border: A 14-year-old boy trying to cross the border into the United States through Nogales was busted with six pounds of meth, and almost six grams of cocaine.

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the boy was carrying a bag full of what appeared to be groceries, but turned out to be meth- and coke-smuggling vessels disguised as groceries.

See also:
-Teens Caught Smuggling More Than 300 Pounds of Weed In Separate Attempts
-Mexican National Tries, and Fails, to Hide 3,000 Pounds of Weed in Cans of Jalapeños
-Agents Find Heroin Stuffed in a Guy's Belly Button
-Bell Peppers Will Not Disguise 2,000 Pounds of Weed

One of CBP's canines sniffed out something in the boy's grocery bag, and officers found the drugs after opening cans of maíz para pozole, or hominy.

CBP values the drugs at more than $90,000.

No further information was released about the boy, since CBP turns over their suspects to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations once they make drug discoveries like this.

However, we can tell you that the boy isn't the only teenager busted trying to move drugs across the border. CBP just passed along information earlier this week that two 16-year-olds were caught trying to bring a combined 300 pounds of marijuana over the border. These boys were over at the border port in Douglas, in separate and unrelated smuggling attempts.



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Follow Matthew Hendley on Twitter at @MatthewHendley.


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Matthew Hendley
Contact: Matthew Hendley