Longform

A LAW DIRTY HARRY WOULD LOVEIT COULD MAKE IT EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER

Page 3 of 3

Meeting alone with the doctor, David admitted he had frightened Roberta. He said he was depressed because of his divorce from his first wife, Carol, his recent retirement from the Air Force and his future prospects.

David stopped going to Dr. Smith after a few meetings, but he quit drinking for more than a year and things did improve at home.

The city of Yuma hired David in March 1985 as its civil engineer. He moved to Arizona about a month before Roberta. By the time she arrived, David was drinking again.

In June 1986, he snapped during a reunion in San Bernardino, California, with old military pals. Roberta claimed David had thrown her on a motel-room bed by her hair and choked her. She told a grand jury he screamed at her, "You bitch, don't ever question a decision that I've made."

A juror asked her how she'd escaped her husband's grasp. Roberta said she had kicked her husband in the groin. "He really intended to kill me," she said.

In December 1986, a few months before the fatal stabbing, David and Roberta went to another reunion in Southern California, this of David's Naval Academy buddies.

A videotape made at the reunion-which was held on the weekend of the Army-Navy football game-demonstrates how the Korzeps behaved in social situations: Her inhibitions loosened by liquor, Roberta was the life of the party, carrying on as if she'd known the gang forever, when actually she'd just met them. David remained mostly in the background, sipping his drinks and watching his wife interact easily with his old pals.

When they got back to Yuma, Roberta recalled, David knocked her around the bedroom and choked her again, this time for allegedly embarrassing him in front of his friends.

part 1 of 2

A LAW DIRTY HARRY WOULD LOVE IT COULD MA... v2-26-92

KEEP PHOENIX NEW TIMES FREE... Since we started Phoenix New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Phoenix, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Paul Rubin
Contact: Paul Rubin