Literary

Chow Bella Weighs in on Martin Cizmar's New Diet Book, Chubster

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I'll admit that when I first heard about the idea for this book I made fun of it. I'm pretty sure my exact words were, "Sounds like something you would find on the clearance table at Urban Outfitters." I mean, come on, "chubster"? Was this dude serious? A book for overweight hipsters? Do overweight hipsters even exist?

Oh wait. I was once an overweight hipster (200 lbs, 5' 7" with an undying love of Fleet Foxes).

And Martin had been one, too.

Until the day I heard about this supposed "book" Martin was writing, I had no idea that he had once weighed in at 290 lbs. That much weight was difficult to picture on Martin's 5'11" frame,  constantly clothed in slim American Apparel t-shirts -- plus the only food I had ever seen the dude eat was Pop Chips.

But it was true. Martin was once 290 lbs and lost more then 100 lbs over the course of eight months and he did it without stepping foot inside of a gym, giving up drinking, or developing a nasty cocaine habit. So how did this self-proclaimed "chubster" lose all that weight?

Unlike my own extremely unhealthy weight loss plan, which consisted of gallons of Cartel Iced Toddies, anti depressants, cigarettes and vodka (hey, don't knock it, I lost 50 lbs), Martin lost weight the old-fashioned, healthy way -- he got off his ass and started counting calories.

Yep, plain ol' simple calorie counting and getting off your barstool to do something a little more active than lifting a pint glass to your lips. That's all.

It's nothing that you haven't heard before. And Martin knows that and he's totally up front about it. Stop eating tons of junk and start exercising and you'll magically become a thinner person. In fact, you can find all the info that in this book on on the Internet if you really look but let's be serious -- it's easier if someone else does the work for you. Plus, most of you need a bit of help with that whole getting starting part.

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Shannon Armour
Contact: Shannon Armour