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Here's an 8-Minute Video of a Man Eating Not One, but Two Whole Cacti

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In today's installment of People Eating Things You Thought They Couldn't (for part one see "Watch This Woman Eat a 72-Ounce Steak in Less Than Three Minutes") we present a video of competitive eater Kevin Strahle, who goes by the name L.A. Beast, eating two cacti. And we're not talking about the needle-less kind.

Strahle says he got the genius idea from Children of Poseidon, an Australian stunt group, and La Fênix, an "alternative humor" troupe, both of whom have also eaten cacti on their YouTube channels.

See also: Seven Ways to Eat Prickly Pear Fruit

Like Molly Schuyler, the competitive eater who now holds a world record for eating a 72-ounce steak in under three minutes, Strahle also has a talent for eating giant steaks. In fact, he was the 27th person to finish The Great Steak Challenge -- as featured on Man v. Food -- and was the third person to ever finish the 82-ounce steak at Lone Star Bar and Grill in Brooklyn.

If you want to check out more of his videos, including one where he consumes two bottles of wasabi and another where he eats a Trinidad Scorpion 7 pepper (a rare pepper that's even hotter than a ghost pepper by, like, a lot), you can check them on the L.A. Beast website.

(Heads up: Some videos are NSFW.)

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