Restaurant News

Pressure Cooking Becoming Hip?

With all of your granny's cooking techniques taking over the hipster community (like canning and preserving), it's only understandable that pressure cooking would be next. One of our grandmothers used to call them Presto Cookers -- one of the most popular brands of pressure cookers at the time.

This method of sealed heat and pressure that makes slow food into fast food is significantly less popular than the slow cooker, but we think that's going to change.

With the help from sites like this one we just found called HipPressureCooking.com, via some Michael Ruhlman love, you'll start changing up your weekday dinner menus because -- why yes, perhaps you do have time to cook an artichoke or brown rice.

Hip Pressure Cooking is written by Italian native Laura Pazzaglia, and she not only shares recipe ideas but actually teaches you about how to change your cooking with a pressure cooker. Just like using the convection setting in your oven, you'll need to manually adjust things like time and temperature in your more standard recipes.

Also, in case you didn't know, there's some majorly dangerous aspects about using a pressure cooker. Mainly, trying not to get burned by the escaping steam or having the heavy metal top blow off and launch like a rocket across your kitchen or into your face. Pazzaglia will help you with the different techniques to depressurize your cooker and lessen your chance of getting hurt.

With super helpful posts like how to convert a recipe to using a pressure cooker and how to properly cook vegetables in a pressure cooker and perfectly roasted garlic in 20 minutes, we've become big fans of this site.

Do you cook with a pressure cooker?

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Jennifer Woods
Contact: Jennifer Woods