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If there's one maxim we believe, it's that musicians and other people in the biz-- like record-company bigwigs, deejays and retailers--are really frustrated critic.

MICHAEL CORNELIUS BASSIST
Housequake, Jodie Foster's Army, Junior Chemists, Zuwal

(in alphabetical order)

BAD BRAINS I Against I (SST, 1986).
BAUHAUS Mask (Beggars Banquet, 1981).
BEASTIE BOYS Paul's Boutique (Capitol, 1989).
BLACK FLAG Jealous Again (SST, 1980).
DESCENDENTS Milo Goes to College (New Alliance, 1982).
DIE KREUZEN Century Days (Touch and Go, 1988).
MINOR THREAT Out of Step (Dischord, 1983).

PUBLIC ENEMY It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (Def Jam/Columbia, 1988).

SACCHARINE TRUST Paganicons (SST, 1981).
TROUBLE FUNK Drop the Bomb (Sugar Hill, 1982).

I am a survivor of the punk explosion of 1980, but my funk roots have never been cut. Each of my selections were cutting- edge advancements in their respective musical forms. They're albums I can listen to at any time and love every cut.

BOB CORRITORE HARPIST
Bob and the Blues Keepers, Buddy Reed and the Rip-It-Ups Featuring Bob Corritore, Grant and the Geezers

1. ANSON FUNDERBURGH AND THE ROCKETS FEATURING SAM MYERS Sins (Black Top, 1987).

2. HENRY GRAY Lucky Man (Blind Pig, 1988).
3. BOWLING GREEN JOHN CEPHAS AND HARMONICA PHIL WIGGINS Dog Days of August (Flying Fish, 1986).

4. SAM MYERS AND ANSON FUNDERBURGH My Love Is Here to Stay (Black Top, 1985).

5. JOHN HAMMOND Nobody But You (Flying Fish, 1987).
6. JAMES "SON" THOMAS Highway 61 Blues (Southern Culture, 1983).
7. VARIOUS ARTISTS Tenth Anniversary Anthology Volume 1: Live at Antone's (Antone's, 1986).

8. JAMES HARMAN BAND Extra Napkins (Rivera, 1988).
9. JOHNNY "BIG MOOSE" WALKER Going Home Tomorrow (Isabel, 1980).
10. HENRY TOWNSEND Mule (Nighthawk, 1980).

The Eighties brought two trends in blues at the same time. Robert Cray created a new, extra-slick, hybrid blues sound contemporary enough to rate MTV time, and the Fabulous Thunderbirds spearheaded a roots revival. (Ironically, they would later buck a trend they helped to start.)

The traditional roots side of blues most appeals to me. A number of veterans found success in teaming up with these new traditionalists. The best example is the combination of Sam Myers and Anson Funderburgh. Four years after their initial pairing, they stole the show at the 1988 W.C. Handy Awards with their tight, no-nonsense band and their beautifully traditional LP, Sins. With the younger keepers of the flame making strong musical statements alongside their elders, it seems as if the future of the blues will be in good hands.

LINDA CUSHMA SINGER
Brides of Science, Girilla School, Laughing Gravy, Major Lingo, Meme and the Egotisticals, Street Music

1. ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST Les Miserables (Geffen, 1986).
2. MIDNIGHT OIL Diesel and Dust (Columbia, 1986).
3. PATTI SMITH Dream of Life (Arista, 1988).

4. ELLA FITZGERALD The Rodgers and Hart Songbook Volume 1; The Rodgers and Hart Songbook Volume II (Verve/Polygram, 1985).

5. ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (CONDUCTED BY LEONARD BERNSTEIN) Peter Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture (Polydor, 1985).

6. POET'S CORNER Life, Love and Laughter (Placebo, 1988).
7. GALEN HEROD Where the Heck Is Mr. Fun? (or Up and Down the Donut With Frank) (Pegna, 1989).

8. THE STRAND The Strand (Local tape, 1987).
9. PRINCE AND THE REVOLUTION Purple Rain (Warner Bros., 1984).
10. ORIGINAL LONDON CAST Aspects of Love, The Original London Cast (Really Useful/Polygram, 1989).

Did Eighties music reflect political avarice, self-serving actions and lack of foresight and social responsibility? Were Live Aid and subsequent projects ingenious commercial coups or genuine stabs at determining the direction of our collective values? Was Eighties music intellectually honest, irresponsibly escapist or stolidly capitalistic?

The independent labels did a great job in bringing music with integrity to small numbers of people, but what about all the scary stuff some of the big guys are bringing to the masses?

JOHN DIXON DEEJAYKEYX-FM, K-15-AM, KSTM-FM, KUKQ-AM 1. JAMES BROWN CD of J.B. (Polydor, 1985).

2. RICHARD AND LINDA THOMPSON Shoot Out the Lights (Hannibal, 1982).
3. LYLE LOVETT Lyle Lovett (Curb/MCA, 1986).
4. WAS (NOT WAS) What Up, Dog? (Chrysalis, 1988).
5. SAM COOKE Live at the Harlem Square Club, 1963 (RCA, 1985).
6. BILLY CLONE AND THE SAME X and Y (Moon Dog, 1979).
7. KATE BUSH The Whole Story (EMI America, 1986).

8. THE NEVILLE BROTHERS Treacherous: A History of the Neville Brothers, 1955-1985 (Rhino, 1988).

9. GREGORY ISAACS Night Nurse (Mango/Island, 1982).
10. DOUG SAHM Juke Box Music (Antone's, 1989).

Okay, so X and Y came out in '79. I got my copy in 1980. It's still the best rock ever from Phoenix. . . . How can I stop with these ten when there are so many more deserving artists out there? One of the problems in the Eighties was radio--fewer songs were played more times. Dive into the record bins before these gems are lost in the digital age of the Nineties.

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