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Ben Quayle's "Busy Day" Video Latest Offensive in Debate Over Debates

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There's a debate over debates waging in an Arizona Congressional race, and it just got ugly.

If you're unfamiliar with the term, a debate over debates is what happens when an underdog in a political race challenges the front-runner to a series of debates. The front runner doesn't immediately respond to the request because, frankly, what's the point? That candidate already is in the lead so why risk a Jan Brewer moment?

The underdog then squeezes all the political capital possible out of the fact that the front-runner hasn't responded to his request. Conflicting stories emerge over whether the front-runner has agreed to any debates, the two finally debate, and we all move on.

The debate over debates going on between Jon Hulburd and Ben Quayle in Arizona's Third Congressional District is about half-way to the finish line. And Hulburd's milking Quayle's silence for all it's worth -- now in the form of a kind of funny video from the Arizona Democratic Party titled "Ben's Busy Day."

Check it out after the jump.


It's juvenile, it's cheap, and it's probably not even close to what an actual day in the life of candidate Quayle actually looks like. It's everything a political junky could ask for.

Hulburd challenged Quayle to six debates and has taken the initiative in scheduling them with the help of organizations like the Arizona Republic and 3TV.

Jennifer Johnson, spokeswoman for Arizona's Democratic Party, tells New Times that not only hasn't Quayle agreed to Hulburd's invitation, he hasn't even responded.

Quayle's communications director, Jay Heiler, tells New Times that's simply not true.

"[Hulburd] knows full-well we've already agreed to several debates, and we're probably gonna agree to more," Heiler says.

Heiler cited several upcoming debates -- not all of which were on the list of debates Hulburd scheduled and announced in a press release.

Hulburd, Heiler suggests, is only eager to debate Quayle so he can gain a little name recognition.

"Unfortunately, Quayle has no obligation to help [Hulburd] invent himself," Heiler says.  

Either way, there's a simple way to end a debate over debates: have a debate.

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