Elections

Matt Salmon May or May Not Have Compared Kirk Adams to the Guy Who Approved Jesus' Execution


If we learned something from congressman-turned-lobbyist-turned-congressional-candidate Matt Salmon this week, it's that the tea party doesn't seem to appreciate comparing politics with the guy who said fine, kill Jesus if you really want to. (That's paraphrased a little.)

That's the highlight from this week's debate between Salmon and Kirk Adams -- at least, that's what the Adams campaign decided to send out.

It's just the latest entry in the file of things that make you go "what?" from Salmon, including Marlboro Man Salmon, pro- and anti-Joe Arpaio Salmon, and for history's sake, Moon-man Salmon.

On the subject of Proposition 100 -- the voter-approved sales-tax increase in 2010 -- Salmon was trying to get the point across that Adams isn't relieved of responsibility for its passage, seeing as Adams was Speaker of the House at the time.

Adams saying he's not responsible for that tax increase, according to Salmon, is "a little like Pontius Pilate washing his hands and saying 'I'm not responsible for that.'"

According to the audience at the Red Mountain Tea Party debate, "Boo!"

Adams then asks Salmon if he's really comparing him to Pontius Pilate, to which Salmon responds, "No."

In possible defense of Salmon, thanks to the tea party's apparent distrust of writing things down and reading off of teleprompters and such things, the debate was labeled a "no-notes" debate, if that makes the reference feel any better to anyone.

Adams' campaign press release says both he and Salmon love America, though, so it looks like everything's OK.

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Matthew Hendley
Contact: Matthew Hendley