Phoenix Transient High on Gasoline Tries (Unsuccessfully) to Convince the Cops His Stash of Gas is Really Insulin | Valley Fever | Phoenix | Phoenix New Times | The Leading Independent News Source in Phoenix, Arizona
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Phoenix Transient High on Gasoline Tries (Unsuccessfully) to Convince the Cops His Stash of Gas is Really Insulin

MCSO John Stephen Beaupied: Sotally tober ​Some people believe in the "use of alternative fuel." Apparently John Stephen Beaupied believes in the alternative use of fuel, which allegedly includes huffing gasoline and scaring the hell out of people at a Phoenix gas station. According to documents obtained by New Times,...
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John Stephen Beaupied: Sotally tober

​Some people believe in the "use of alternative fuel." Apparently John Stephen Beaupied believes in the alternative use of fuel, which allegedly includes huffing gasoline and scaring the hell out of people at a Phoenix gas station.

According to documents obtained by New Times, Beaupied, a 45-year-old transient, was harassing customers and asking for beer at a Circle K near 7th Street and Carefree Highway Thursday evening, leading to several customers asking the store's clerk to call police.

The cops showed up, where they found Beaupied holding a plastic bottle and absolutely reeking of gasoline.

Police asked him what was in the plastic bottle, and Beaupied told them it was his insulin.

A cop then "asked him if his insulin was gasoline. He told me it was."

Naturally, police arrested Beaupied, but he told the cops he couldn't be arrested because gasoline wasn't illegal to sniff.

He probably should have kept playing the diabetes card with the cops, because he now faces a felony charge of abusing a vapor-releasing substance, along with disorderly conduct and possession of drug paraphernalia.

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