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| Crime |

Pinal County Man Breaks Into Same House Twice in as Many Days

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A Pinal County man (who happens to look a lot like Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu) apparently wasn't satisfied with the stuff he stole from a woman's house during one burglary, so he burglarized the same exact house the very next day.

According to the Pinal County Sheriff's Office, on September 22, around 3 a.m., police got a call from a woman who said she could see a man with a flashlight downstairs in her house.

She locked herself in an upstairs bathroom until police responded.

When police got to the house, they found it had been burglarized. Police found that the burglar had broken in through a side window and stolen guns and cash from the victim's house but had escaped before police got there.

The very next night, police got a similar call from the same woman -- at the same house.

Around 9:50 p.m., the woman was back in the same upstairs bathroom hiding as the burglar rifled through her stuff.

This time, when police responded to the house, the burglar was still there.

While searching the house, cops saw 32-year-old Albert Graham run out the door.

Officers followed Graham on foot but he was able to get away.

Police set up a perimeter in the area of the foot chase and a citizen directed them to a home, where Graham was found hiding under a waterbed.

Police executed a search warrant for Graham's mother's house, where they found items taken during the first burglary.

A friend of Graham's, 31-year-old Erin Lansberry, admitted to police that she drove Graham to the burglarized home on the night of the first burglary.

Graham is facing charges of burglary, possession of stolen property, theft, assault, and criminal damage. He is being held on a $50,000 bond.

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