Snowflake Man to Serve 26 Months in Stabbing of Co-Worker in Iraq; Was Indicted Under Military Law | Valley Fever | Phoenix | Phoenix New Times | The Leading Independent News Source in Phoenix, Arizona
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Snowflake Man to Serve 26 Months in Stabbing of Co-Worker in Iraq; Was Indicted Under Military Law

Aaron Bridges Langston, 32, of Snowflake, will serve 26 months in a federal prison for stabbing his co-worker in the neck while working in Iraq. Langston, who worked for the Defense Department contractor Kellogg Brown and Root, was the supervisor for an Indian national woman he attacked on February 15,...

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Aaron Bridges Langston, 32, of Snowflake, will serve 26 months in a federal prison for stabbing his co-worker in the neck while working in Iraq.

Langston, who worked for the Defense Department contractor Kellogg Brown and Root, was the supervisor for an Indian national woman he attacked on February 15, 2007 while at the Al Asad Airbase in Iraq. According to a news release by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Arizona and news reports at the time, Langston nicked Gaddam Narayana's jugular vein, but she later recovered. (Here's the 2007

news release on the incident, courtesy of the feds).


Langston was the first U.S. contractor to be indicted under the Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act of 2000, and his case received some coverage in human rights circles, but not much media attention in his home state.

He seems to be getting off light, though -- one article says he could have received 10 years for this crime.

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