4

Top Five Most-Read Phoenix News Stories of the Week

^
Keep New Times Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Phoenix and help keep the future of New Times free.

In case you missed any news action this week, we've got you covered.

Here's our recap of the most-read news stories of the week:

5.) Paul Babeu Supporter Organizing Murrieta-Style Protest in Oracle, Says Babeu Tipped Him Off

 

A longtime supporter of Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu says the sheriff tipped him off that 40 to 50 migrant kids would soon be placed in his community.

Oracle resident Robert Skiba believes that the minors will be bused by federal authorities to the Sycamore Canyon Academy on Tuesday.

He told me in an interview this morning that he first heard of the transfer from Babeu at an NRA women's leadership forum held in Tucson, where Babeu was the featured speaker.

"I was at a luncheon in Tucson last Thursday," Skiba explained. "And Sheriff Paul Babeu gave a beautiful speech on immigration.

"At the end of the speech, he looked at me and he said, 'Mr. Skiba, the government's going to put 40 Central American kids in your community in the very, very near future.'

See also: Paul Babeu Supporter Organizing Murrieta-Style Protest in Oracle, Says Babeu Tipped Him Off

4.) Two Top-Ranking ASU PD Officials Leave Positions Following Ersula Ore Controversy

 

A second high-ranking Arizona State University police department official is stepping down unexpectedly following a backlash over the arrest of assistant professor Ersula Ore.

Another email that surfaced on a blog by people disgruntled with ASU police confirms that Assistant Chief James Hardina is leaving this week. ASU Police Chief John Pickens is also leaving his position, moving into another university position. Both departures come as one of their officers, Stewart Ferrin, is being scrutinized by the FBI at the request of ASU.

See also: Two Top-Ranking ASU PD Officials Leave Positions Following Ersula Ore Controversy

3.) The U.S. Tries to Deport Not Protect Children Fleeing Violence in Central America

 

Darlin Adonay Peña has a headache.

On a Wednesday afternoon in May, he takes a break from his job flipping burgers at a McDonald's on Central Avenue in Phoenix to sit down and talk, sipping a frozen caramel coffee drink and rubbing his almond eyes.

A brown rosary peeks from beneath his shiny black uniform. He's shaved both sides of his head, taming a few meticulous black curls atop with gel.

See also: The U.S. Tries to Deport Not Protect Children Fleeing Violence in Central America

2.) Maricopa County Sheriff's Deputy Fatally Shoots Naked, Erratic Army Veteran

 

An army veteran was shot and killed by a Maricopa County Sheriff's deputy yesterday in Fountain Hills, the Sheriff's Office says.

David Brandstetter, 26, was walking naked in traffic at around 12:45 a.m. Sunday, prompting two calls to 911 as drivers swerved to avoid striking him, MCSO reports.

See also: Maricopa County Sheriff's Deputy Fatally Shoots Naked, Erratic Army Veteran

1.) 10 of the Largest Objects in America That Can Be Found in Arizona

 

There's a saying that everything's bigger in Texas, and that's a lie.

Here are 10 things that are either the nation's or world's largest, and can be found right here in Arizona:

See also: 10 of the Largest Objects in America That Can Be Found in Arizona

Keep Phoenix New Times Free... Since we started Phoenix New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Phoenix, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Phoenix with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Phoenix.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Phoenix.