News

What Must Steiger Think?

Maybe Sam Steiger can appreciate the humor in the current mess at the state parole board.

Governor Rose Mofford has fired board member Ron Johnson without pay.
Ironically, Steiger tried to do the same thing to Johnson more than a year ago and almost went to jail for his efforts.

Despite a massive legal onslaught, Steiger's still the only one in the Mecham administration Bob Corbin's gang managed to convict of a felony.

The verdict is still under appeal. A hearing is set for this month. But it has cost Steiger more than his life savings in attorneys' fees. Once Steiger was one of the most popular political figures in the state. He won five consecutive terms in Congress.

But now he must bear the mark of being a convicted felon. Clearly, Steiger was targeted. His conviction falls more in the category of revenge than justice. Steiger was Mecham's trouble-shooter. He was also the ex-governor's window on reality. It was Steiger who called Ron Johnson a scam artist and began making moves to do the same thing Governor Mofford has now done.

Johnson had his fingers in uncounted pies. Principal among them was that he was a full-time justice of the peace as well as a parole board member.

Now Governor Mofford has learned that Johnson wrongfully accepted $4,500 in vacation pay. That's enough. She booted him out.

Corbin was blinded to Johnson's faults. All Corbin sought was revenge against Mecham. He charged that Steiger was guilty of intimidating and threatening Johnson.

What is the difference between what Steiger attempted to do and what Mofford is doing right now?

Now perhaps people will understand that Steiger was right all the time.

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Tom Fitzpatrick