Chow Bella

Gross Out: The Rubber Gloves Are On, But Is That Enough?

By Amy Silverman

A reader just called me out on my Sprinkles "Gross Out" from last week, asking how would I feel if I knew the employee who touched my cupcake with bare hands had just picked her nose.

Touche. In fact, dear reader, you should know that my own husband lectured me over the same thing! That led to a discussion about whether people do gross things with gloves on (scratch an itch, pick up garbage, that kind of thing) as often as they do with gloves off. He claims it's harder to get your finger up there with a glove on. Maybe.

I find it funny that moments after the Sprinkles comment popped up, so did last month's inspection of the APS Cafe at 2123 W. Cheryl Drive in Phoenix.

The cafe is in big trouble with health inspectors for myriad and repeated broken rules, but the violation that stood out for me was this:

NOTED EMPLOYEE USING THE RESTROOM AND PROCEEDED TO WEAR GLOVES WITHOUT WASHING HER HANDS.

Now, my question: Did she wear the gloves to the bathroom? I don't think so; I think she just didn't wash up before touching the gloves (gross) and putting them on.

I'm not sure whose point that proves, but I thought it was entertaining.

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Amy Silverman is a two-time winner of the Arizona Press Club’s Journalist of the Year award. Her work has appeared on the radio show This American Life and in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Lenny Letter, and Brain, Child. She’s the co-curator of the live reading series Bar Flies, and a commentator for KJZZ, the NPR affiliate in Phoenix. Silverman is the author of the book My Heart Can’t Even Believe It: A Story of Science, Love, and Down Syndrome (Woodbine House 2016). Follow her on Instagram (@amysilverman), Twitter (@amysilvermanaz), and at amy-silverman.com.