Music Features

Tuba in Tow, The Hooten Hallers Hit the Road

In explaining the Hooten Hallers, it's best to begin with what this three-piece is not. The band, despite frequent media references to the contrary, is not a hillbilly band. It is from Missouri, not Appalachia.

"You know, I don't know," says drummer Andy Rehm by phone from a roadside pullout west of Kansas City. "We are from a section of rural America, but I don't think any of us really identifies with the term hillbilly all that much. It's not a shameful term, but we were not raised in a traditional rural setting. More specifically, in an Appalachian setting, which is where the term, I think, comes from. The hillbilly word is strangely used."

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Glenn BurnSilver
Contact: Glenn BurnSilver