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Beanie Wells Catches T.O. Syndrome; Whines to Media About Playing Time

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There's a good way to get a reputation in the National Football League for being a prima donna crybaby: piss and moan about team business to the media.

With Anquan Boldin gone, the Arizona Cardinals are without the token team crybaby. Enter running back Beanie Wells.

Rather than commiserate Sunday's loss to the San Diego Chargers in silence, Wells opted to whine to the Arizona Republic about how little he played.

"I'm not worried about the quarterback situation, I'm worried about my situation," Wells said yesterday. "I didn't get into the game until there were four minutes left in the second quarter (Sunday against the Chargers) and I have no clue as to why," Wells told the paper yesterday. I'd like to think I'm a big part of this thing, but right now, I don't feel it."

Like most of the NFL's notorious crybabies, Wells is a good player. He's also young and could potentially be a great player.

Great players usually keep their mouths shut -- not call out their teammates and coaching staff, which Wells reportedly did shortly after whining about playing time.

"It's crazy. I have no clue what they're thinking upstairs. I would like to know, but hey, I'm definitely not pleased about it," Wells griped.

He says he wants to have a private discussion with coach Ken Whisenhunt.

"Oh, we're definitely going to have a talk," Wells says.

Wells had five carries for 19 yards on Sunday. Running back Tim Hightower got most of the carries and Wells isn't happy about that, either.

"No discredit to Tim, but I hate to sit on the sideline watching. I'd rather be out there contributing to the team and that's something I'm not pleased about," he says.As the saying goes, there's no "I" in team. However, there is one in "Beanie."

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