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Ex-Arizona School Administrator Accused of Accessing Porn on Computer Quits New Job

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Jaime Castellano, a former school district superintendent in Apache County, resigned as executive director at a Pennsylvania charter school after the school disclosed why he'd left his job in Arizona.

A local paper near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, reports that Castellano "resigned suddenly" last month, and it's now been disclosed that Castellano gave up his credentials in Arizona after alleged computer misuse.

Castellano stepped down from his position as a superintendent of the Ganado Unified School District on the Navajo Nation in December 2012, after Arizona's State Board of Education alleged that he accessed "adult websites" and had "sexually explicit images on his district issued laptop," according to a document from an Arizona Board of Education meeting.

After the Board notified Castellano of their intent to file a complaint seeking disciplinary actions, he surrendered his teaching certifications in February 2013.

The Board notified other states by posting on the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification website (NASDTEC), according to ADE spokeswoman Ashley Dammen. But because Castellano was never formally investigated, the reasoning behind his relinquishment of his certificates is not visible.

"All the school certification departments (in other states) will be able to see is surrender due to disciplinary actions," Dammen said. "There won't be any further description."

That didn't stop Castellano from becoming the executive director of the Vida Charter School in Gettysburg in July 2013. That school released a statement to local papers Monday declining to comment on both the hiring and resignation of Castellano.

Teaching certifications vary from state to state, but since Vida is a charter school, Pennsylvania law only requires 75 percent of the professional staff to hold teaching certification. However, in their application for a new executive director to replace Castellano, Vida lists that candidates must have either a valid Pennsylvania administrative certificate that covers grades K-6 or the ability to be certified by February 2015.

Castellano is not eligible to reapply for teaching certificates in Arizona for approximately four more years.

Follow Valley Fever on Twitter at @ValleyFeverPHX.

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