Police

Chandler to Pay $1.1M for Officer Shooting of 17-Year-Old Anthony Cano

Chandler will pay $1.1 million in the January 2 police shooting of Anthony Cano, 17.
Chandler will pay $1.1 million in the January 2 police shooting of Anthony Cano, 17. Bodycam video
click to enlarge Chandler will pay $1.1 million in the January 2 police shooting of Anthony Cano, 17. - BODYCAM VIDEO
Chandler will pay $1.1 million in the January 2 police shooting of Anthony Cano, 17.
Bodycam video
The family of Anthony Cano, a 17-year-old boy fatally shot by a police officer in Chandler, has settled a wrongful-death lawsuit against the city for over $1 million, bringing a legal battle to a quick end.

Under the settlement approved on Thursday by the Chandler City Council, Cano's mother, Renee Clum, will receive $1 million; Cano's father, Anthony Cano Sr., will receive $125,000.

The city admits no fault under the settlement, and the officer involved, Chase Bebak-Miller, continues to serve pending an internal investigation from the Maricopa County Attorney’s office, according to Chandler spokesperson Matthew Burdick.

click to enlarge Anthony Cano - GOFUNDME
Anthony Cano
GoFundMe
The shooting happened on January 2 at around 9 p.m., when the officer attempted to stop Cano for riding his bike in the road without a taillight. A foot chase ensued, leading Cano and Babak-Miller into a park. Cano then dropped a gun and attempted to pick it up.

Bebak-Miller shot Cano within seconds of commanding him to get on the ground. Cano laid facedown, incapacitated after the shot when Babak-Miller decided to shoot again. The shots were one-to-two seconds apart.

The city of Chandler released edited bodycam footage of the shooting in January, then released the extended body cam footage in March under pressure from the public.

In the extended bodycam footage, the Babak-Miller can be heard telling the boy to put his hands behind his back, to which Cano replied, “I'm sorry, sir. I can't." Cano also told him that he had tried to throw away the handgun, a stolen, loaded 9mm, to which the officer replied, "that was stupid."

As Cano was being handcuffed, he said “I don't want to die.”

The words sent shockwaves through Chandler, which spurred protests at Chandler City Hall throughout the ensuing weeks.

In March, five people were arrested in Chandler during a Cano protest (see video of the arrests below.)

For friends and family, the focus shifts to Bebak-Miller’s investigation.

“The fight will continue,” said Phil Martinez, a Phoenix-area activist who is close to the family.

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