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Top Five Most-Read Phoenix News Stories of the Week

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In case you missed any news action this week, we've got you covered.

Here's our recap of the most-read news stories of the week:

5.) Documentary Questions Whether Drug Lord "El Chapo" Guzmán Actually Was Captured

 

Not everyone is convinced that drug lord Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, head of Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel, actually was arrested by authorities earlier this year.

Documentary filmmaker Charlie Minn, who's produced several movies about drug violence in Mexico, says he went to El Paso, Texas, after hearing of Guzmán's arrest in Mazatlán, Sinaloa, Mexico, and it didn't take long to hear people's disbelief.

"I heard people kind of mumbling, 'I don't think it's him,'" Minn tells New Times.

See also: Documentary Questions Whether Drug Lord "El Chapo" Guzmán Actually Was Captured

4.) Phoenix Firefighter Gary Johnstone and Trever Crouse Killed, One Hurt in Camelback Fall

 

Off-duty Phoenix firefighter Gary Johnstone was killed and two teenage boys were hurt after falling from a popular rappelling site Friday morning at Camelback Mountain.

(See below for update and details about the second victim who succumbed to his injuries Friday night.)

Johnstone, 50, had been with the fire department for about 15 years, and worked with the close-knit technical rescue team, says spokesman Mark Vanacore. He was also an honor guard member, in which he played the bagpipes.

One of the teens remains in critical condition as of Friday afternoon.

See also: Phoenix Firefighter Gary Johnstone and Trever Crouse Killed, One Hurt in Camelback Fall

3.) Arizona Medical-Marijuana Patients Could Buy Pot in Nevada Dispensaries Under New Plan

 

Medical-marijuana patients from Arizona and other states could shop legally at as-yet-unopened Nevada dispensaries under a plan being developed by Nevada authorities.

Chad Westom, bureau chief of the Nevada Division of Public & Behavioral Health, said on Monday that his state's new medical-marijuana program will honor Arizona registration cards.

See also: Arizona Medical-Marijuana Patients Could Buy Pot in Nevada Dispensaries Under New Plan

2.) Flowchart: How to Pick a Republican Candidate for Arizona Governor

 

The primary election is two weeks away, early ballots have already hit mailboxes, and the latest polls show about half of Arizona's Republican voters are still undecided on a candidate for governor.

For you Republican voters, we made a flowchart that will help you select a candidate in less than 60 seconds:

See also: Flowchart: How to Pick a Republican Candidate for Arizona Governor

1.) Battle Royale: Controversial Mary Rose Wilcox Is in the Political Fight of Her Life

 

Mary Rose Wilcox was shot in 1997 by a transient who didn't like her politics.

People say she was hit in a buttock, but she insists the wound was higher than that. Indeed, the gunman's hollow-point bullet shattered her pelvis. It also shattered her desire to remain in public office.

Briefly.

Some family members pleaded with her to walk away from her seat on the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors at the time, but Wilcox decided to continue in the political arena.

"What could I do?" a defiant Wilcox recalls. "If I left, he won. So I went back."

Nearly 20 years later, she's in the final week of her bid for an open seat in Arizona's 7th Congressional District.

She's running against three other Democrats: Ruben Gallego, a Marine and former state lawmaker; Randy Camacho, a social-studies teacher and former Congressional candidate, and the Reverend Jarrett Maupin, a firebrand who's gathering political support from churchgoers in South Phoenix.

Immigration attorney Joe Peñalosa, an Independent, and Joe Cobb, a white Libertarian and perennial political candidate, also are in the race to represent a nearly 200-square-mile district that spans several communities, including Phoenix, Guadalupe, Tolleson, and southern portions of Glendale. It's a safe district for progressive politicos where 68 percent of voters are registered Democrats and 64 percent of 710,000 residents are Latino.

Congressman Ed Pastor, who unexpectedly announced in February that he would retire, served the area for 23 years and easily captured two to four times as many votes as his opponents in the past decade. It's hard to remember a time when Pastor stirred up controversy.

See also: Battle Royale: Controversial Mary Rose Wilcox Is in the Political Fight of Her Life

Got a tip? Send it to: Matthew Hendley.

Follow Valley Fever on Twitter at @ValleyFeverPHX. Follow Matthew Hendley at @MatthewHendley.

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