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Top Five Most-Read Phoenix News Stories of the Week

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In case you missed any news action this week, we've got you covered.

Here's our recap of the most-read news stories of the week:

5.) Being Drunk in Public Is Not a Crime, According to Arizona Appeals Court

 

Being drunk in public is not a crime, according to an Arizona Appeals Court decision.

The court was considering the case of a man cited for public intoxication in Scottsdale in December 2011, and the three-member panel unanimously ruled that state law has a specific ban on city ordinances outlawing public intoxication.

See also: Being Drunk in Public Is Not a Crime, According to Arizona Appeals Court

4.) ACLU Looking Into Phoenix's "Project ROSE" Prostitution Busts

 

The American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona is looking into the program known as "Project ROSE," which involves sending suspected prostitutes to a church-based diversion program as an option to avoid jail.

The ACLU has filed records requests seeking a wealth of information on the program, which is a collaboration between the Phoenix Police Department and Arizona State University's School of Social Work.

See also: ACLU Looking Into Phoenix's "Project ROSE" Prostitution Busts

3.) Joe Arpaio's Ex-Deputy Arrested After Barricade Situation Is Ramon Charley Armendariz, Say Police Sources

 

The MCSO remains quiet on the name of the 40-year-old ex-MCSO deputy who apparently barricaded himself in his home late Sunday night until surrendering around 1:30 a.m. And the Phoenix Police Department is referring all questions to the MCSO.

But reliable police sources tell me the ex-deputy involved is Ramon Charley Armendariz, a key player in the ACLU's big civil rights case Melendres v. Arpaio.

See also: Joe Arpaio's Ex-Deputy Arrested After Barricade Situation Is Ramon Charley Armendariz, Say Police Sources

2.) A Lot of People Don't Like Living in Arizona, Poll Says

 

There are a lot of people in Arizona who'd rather live somewhere else.

According to polling done by Gallup, 38 percent of the Arizonans they polled said they'd like to move to another state. Only 11 other states had higher percentages of people who wanted to leave.

See also: A Lot of People Don't Like Living in Arizona, Poll Says

1.) 10 Things Phoenix Drivers Need to Relearn From the Driver's License Manual

 

If you spend enough time on the highways around Phoenix, you've undoubtedly noticed that it's hard to go for a drive without witnessing an act of sheer stupidity from another driver.

That said, we revisited the state's driver manual, and picked out 10 things everyone needs to relearn, now:

See also: 10 Things Phoenix Drivers Need to Relearn From the Driver's License Manual


Follow Valley Fever on Twitter at @ValleyFeverPHX.
Follow Matthew Hendley at @MatthewHendley.

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