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Looking for Arizona Honey? Here Are 13 Places Where You'll Find it

Mark Fratu at the Old Town Scottsdale Farmers Market.EXPAND
Mark Fratu at the Old Town Scottsdale Farmers Market.
Bahar Anooshahr

The state of Arizona is as packed with honey vendors as a hive is with honey. Here are 13 honey pushers and where to find their Arizona-based bee products in greater Phoenix.

Arizona Honey Market

Mark Fratu borrowed a beehive from a local beekeeper in 2006. After the economic upset in 2008, the former investor picked up beekeeping full time. Today, he cares for 15 hives of Africanized killer bees under the name Arizona Honey Market. Aside from seven flavors of raw honey and aged honey, he also carries pollen, honeycomb, and propolis (a resinous material bees make and use as a structural material in the hive). Purchase directly from the website or at the Old Town Scottsdale Farmers Market when in season.

Absolutely Delightful

Owner Eleanor Dziuk created Absolutely Delightful as a platform for selling local honey harvested by a number of beekeepers. Now in business for 15 years. it represents 10 Arizona beekeepers. Some of the honey is sold as is; others she infuses with flavors like cinnamon and lavender. She offers raw and whipped honey in multiple sizes along with beeswax, honeycomb, bee pollen, royal jelly (a material secreted by bees to feed the queen), and propolis. You can find Absolutely Delightful products online or at the Uptown, Downtown Phoenix, Gilbert, Roadrunner, and Peoria farmers' markets.

Keep and eye out for the Beetanical Garden Farm booth.EXPAND
Keep and eye out for the Beetanical Garden Farm booth.
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Beetanical Garden Farm

Owned by Bianca Olar and her family, Beetanical Garden Farm has been in business for more than 10 years. Olar does not infuse her honey as she says she values the pure flavor of the product. You can find her at the following farmers’ markets: Roadrunner, Downtown Phoenix, and seasonally at Old Town Scottsdale. Additionally, Squarz Bakery & Cafe, Audrey’s, and Savale Flowers Antiques sell Beetanical Garden honey.

The Golden Hive

Based in Flagstaff, The Golden Hive is run by Tracy Heirigs, who began selling bee products like candles, skincare, propolis, and honey almost 20 years ago. She sells for six to eight local beekeepers (and has been a hobby beekeeper herself for the past 10 years). With a small number of hives, she harvests a limited amount of honey, which she sells at the Flagstaff store. But you can also find Golden Hive products at the Old Town Scottsdale Farmers Market and through the website.

Honey products from the Bridle Path Beeyard.EXPAND
Honey products from the Bridle Path Beeyard.
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Bridle Path Beeyard

Owned by veterinarian Joc Rawls, Bridle Path Beeyard is an urban bee garden — meaning the hives are in Rawls’ backyard. His gentle treatment of the bees since the business started in 2016 has endeared him even to the vegans. Bridle Path honey, which comes in various sized jars, is available for purchase online (for pick up at the beeyard) or at the community table at Uptown Farmers Market and Downtown Phoenix Farmers Market.

Crockett Honey Co.

In business since 1945, Crockett Honey’s 6,500 hives are along the Colorado River in Parker, Arizona — but the bottling facility and store are both in Tempe. Aside from honey, the store also carries bee pollen, beeswax, and beekeeping supplies. Crocket Honey products are sold in most grocery stores (think Fry’s, Safeway, Bashas', Sprouts). The Sunshine Specialty Foods booth at the Ahwatukee Farmers' Market also carries Crockett Honey.

Desert blossom honey from Peoria's McClendon’s Select Organic Farm.EXPAND
Desert blossom honey from Peoria's McClendon’s Select Organic Farm.
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McClendon’s Select Organic Farm

Located in Peoria and spanning 25 acres, McClendon's Select Organic Farm is known in the west Valley and beyond for its honey produce (even though it also carries fruits, vegetables, and dates). The main attraction from this family-owned farm is its desert blossom honey, which comes in a 32-ounce jar, and 16 and 8-ounce squeeze bottles. Order online, add some honey to your grab-and-go produce box, or visit the McClendon’s Select booth at the Old Town Scottsdale and Uptown farmers’ markets.

Rango Honey

Rango Honey, family-owned and operated, has been selling Sonoran desert honey since 2015. Today it owns 1,500 hives. Products include alpha clover, orange blossom, mesquite, and desert bloom-flavored honey, plus bee pollen and honeycomb. In addition, profits support the Nashama center, an assisted living facility for adults with autism, inspired by the the owners’ autistic son. Order from the website or check the site’s store locater to purchase in person (think Bashas', Ace Hardware, and specialty markets like Luci's at the Orchard and Duck & Decanter).

Sun Tan Honey Farm offers all kinds of bee products.
Sun Tan Honey Farm offers all kinds of bee products.
Sun Tan Honey Farm

Sun Tan Honey Farm

Sun Tan Honey Farm was established in 2014 by Santos Vasquez and Shawn White. Together, the two have 20 years of bee experience. They specialize in chemical-free, humane bee removal and relocation and take the relocated hives to apiaries across the Valley. There, the bees produce a variety of honey that the team harvests and sells. Find them at the Arrowhead and Pinnacle Peak farmers’ markets. A few stores also carry Sun Tan Honey, including west Valley spots like Adams Natural Meats, Screws and Sparkles, Grungy Galz, The Grand Project Shoppe, and an Ace Hardware in Buckeye.

Singh Meadows

Owner and farmer Ken Singh runs a farm offering chemical-free heirloom produce, moringa, and guava trees — but there's also a beekeeper onsite. You can buy his honey at the Singh Meadows farmer’s market in Tempe, which offers a good selection of that raw honey. Current hours are 7 a.m. to noon, Friday and Saturday. Check the Facebook page for up-to-date information.

Sun Valley Bees is a hobby-turned-business honey operation.EXPAND
Sun Valley Bees is a hobby-turned-business honey operation.
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Sun Valley Bees

Sun Valley Bees is a “son and pop” farm that started as a hobby in 2007 by John Ciurdar, a cabinetmaker. In 2013, after his son Daniel graduated college, the hobby turned business. The bees are kept in Laveen and Buckeye and are moved around to produce different types of honey for different seasons. In addition to five flavors of honey, packaged in three sizes, Sun Valley Bees also carries honeycomb, propolis, beeswax, royal jelly, and bee pollen. Order online, pickup directly from the farmhouse, or visit the Uptown, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, and Peoria farmers’ markets.

The Rancher’s Daughter

The Rancher’s Daughter honey comes from the bees at A Diamond Ranch in Kearny, Arizona. You're probably more familiar with its jojoba beef, the operation's signature product, but the ranch has a beekeeper who moves hives near the Gila River. Kristen Vinson, the Rancher’s Daughter herself, describes the honey's flavor as somewhere between mesquite and desert flower. The honey comes in three sizes: 8, 16, and 32 ounces. Purchase at Uptown and Old Town Scottsdale farmers’ markets. For questions, email kvinson@gmail.com.

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A selection of honey from Valley Honey Co.EXPAND
A selection of honey from Valley Honey Co.
Bahar Anooshahr

Valley Honey Co.

Valley Honey Co. is a owned by a fourth-generation family of Valley residents, and happens to be a migratory beekeeping business. That means the bees are moved between California (to pollinate almond trees in February) and then to Arizona (to produce seasonal honey). Queen Creek Olive Mill, Shoppers Supply in Chandler, locations of AJ’s Fine Foods, and Power Road Farmers Market in Mesa are among the spots carrying Valley Honey.

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